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I am trying to write a method that accepts the array of houses and a price, priceLimit. I want the method to return an array of houses for the houses whose price is less than or equal to priceLimit. I want to make a pass over the data to determine how big to make the return array. The problem is that I can not figure out how to add House objects from houses array to the lowPriceHouses array. The error I am getting is:

    Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NullPointerException at 
prob3.HouseTester.getLowPriced(HouseTester.java:76) at 
prob3.HouseTester.main(HouseTester.java:52)

The code

private static House[] getLowPriced(House[] houses, double priceLimit) 
{

    House[] lowPriceHouses = null;
    int index = 0;

    for (int i = 0; i <= houses.length; i++)
    {
        double prices = houses[i].getPrice();
        if (prices <= priceLimit)
            lowPriceHouses[index++] = houses[i];
    }

    return lowPriceHouses;  
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The error is because lowPriceHouses is null, you've not initialised it. You will also have problems with your loop, Java arrays are 0 indexed.

So, instead of

for (int i = 0; i <= houses.length; i++)

You should be using...

for (int i = 0; i < houses.length; i++)

The problem you have is knowing how many elements will match you are case.

Now, you could mess around with System.arraycopy or just use some kind of List instead.

You could then use List#toArray to convert the list back to an array when you're done with it.

See Collections for more details

Updated with example

private static House[] getLowPriced(House[] houses, double priceLimit) 
{

    List<House> lowPriceHouses = new ArrayList<House>(houses.length);

    for (int i = 0; i <= houses.length; i++)
    {
        double prices = houses[i].getPrice();
        if (prices <= priceLimit)
            lowPriceHouses.add(houses[i]);
    }

    return lowPriceHouses.toArray(new House[lowPriceHouses.size()]);  
}
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When you specify the ArrayList why do you define the length ? I mean isn't it possible that lowPriceHouses would be less than the original array ? Wouldn't that hold empty elements ? –  Dimitar Dimitrov Aug 27 '13 at 2:53
    
@DimitarDimitrov ArrayList is a dynamic array, that is, it can contain more or less items and it will grow as you need it to. But there is a price to be paid for this. As the list grows beyond it's current "limit", it needs to be resized. This is done by adding a few "empty" spaces into it's buffer. But this takes time and memory to do. Instead, we provide a "guess" of the number of values we might have. This makes it faster. Since we know we will never have more than houses.length items, it's safe to use this value as or initialiser. –  MadProgrammer Aug 27 '13 at 2:58
    
I see, so this won't allocate the array it would just set a limit ? –  Dimitar Dimitrov Aug 27 '13 at 2:59
    
Thanks. At first I was getting null at the end of my list but making it into an array list then converting it back really helped. –  Kelli Davis Aug 27 '13 at 2:59
1  
It sets a "initialCapacity", you can freely run over this limit and the ArrayList will grow automatically –  MadProgrammer Aug 27 '13 at 3:00

You need to create the array before you write to it.

House[] lowPriceHouses = null;

should be something like

House[] lowPriceHouses = new House[houses.length]; 

you actually want a smaller array since, you might not need all houses.. It would be easier to make this a ArrayList and then convert it toArray before returning.


for (int i = 0; i <= houses.length; i++)

You want to do only <

This is because when you have an array of size 10, the elements are indexed from 0 - 9. Thus accessing the element arr[10] will lead to issues.

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I am still getting an error: Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NullPointerException at prob3.HouseTester.getLowPriced(HouseTester.java:76) at prob3.HouseTester.main(HouseTester.java:52) –  Kelli Davis Aug 27 '13 at 2:38
    
@KelliDavis there are 2 problems, I have updated it with both, take a look. –  Karthik T Aug 27 '13 at 2:41
    
Just as an aside, this sort of task seems to be better suited to a Set than a List. It may be that a list of Houses has some kind of inherent order such that an index is naturally associated with a House ... but, I'm thinking it's not what I'd expect here. You're really just dealing with a collection of Houses. If this were me, I'd make my life simpler by simply returning a Collection of Houses (Set, List, whatever). –  scottb Aug 27 '13 at 4:57
    
@scottb you might want to either link to OP or better yet comment on the question, else he may not see this –  Karthik T Aug 27 '13 at 5:00

You lowPriceHouses is Null so you are getting NullPointerException. Please replace with below code

private static House[] getLowPriced(House[] houses, double priceLimit)  {
    List<House> lowPriceHouses  = new ArrayList<House>()
    int index = 0;

    for (int i = 0; i <= houses.length; i++)
    {
         double prices = houses[i].getPrice();
         if (prices <= priceLimit)
           lowPriceHouses.add(houses[i]);
    }

    return lowPriceHouses.toArray(new House[lowPriceHouses.size()]); 
}
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Alternatively, if you are using Java 8, you could do this:

public static House[] getLowPriced(final House[] houses, final double limit){
    final List<House> list = Arrays.asList(houses).stream().filter(h -> h.getPrice() <= limit).sorted(Comparator.comparing(House::getPrice)).collect(Collectors.toList());
    return list.toArray(new House[list.size()]);
}
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Boy ... that sure is ugly to look at. –  scottb Aug 27 '13 at 4:58

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