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say I have DataFrame which looks like this

In [5]: dates = pd.date_range('20130101',periods=6)

In [6]: dates

<class 'pandas.tseries.index.DatetimeIndex'>
[2013-01-01 00:00:00, ..., 2013-01-06 00:00:00]
Length: 6, Freq: D, Timezone: None

In [7]: df = pd.DataFrame(np.arange(0,24).reshape([6,4]),index=dates,columns=list('ABCD'))

In [8]: df

             A   B   C   D
2013-01-01   0   1   2   3
2013-01-02   4   5   6   7
2013-01-03   8   9  10  11
2013-01-04  12  13  14  15
2013-01-05  16  17  18  19
2013-01-06  20  21  22  23

I would like to reshape df into something like this

             A   B   C   D   A_1   B_1   C_1   D_1   A_2   B_2   C_2   D_2
2013-01-03   8   9  10  11   4     5     6     7     0     1     2     3
2013-01-04  12  13  14  15   8     9     10    11    4     5     6     7
2013-01-05  16  17  18  19   12    13    14    15    8     9     10    11
2013-01-06  20  21  22  23   16    17    18    19    12    13    14    15

Basically, it flatten the previous two rows and put it as additional columns. How can I achieve this efficiently? (also, can I have unique column headers too)

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this shouldn't be necessary, you can use rolling_apply and friends to do calculations without this reshaping hack. –  Andy Hayden Aug 27 '13 at 9:42

3 Answers 3

I really don't know why would you do this, but here is how it could be done:

dates   = pd.date_range('20130101',periods=6)
columns = list('ABCD')
df = pd.DataFrame(np.arange(0,24).reshape([6,4]),index=dates,columns=columns)

# First setup some constants
values  = df.values.reshape(df.values.size,)
step    = 4
size    = step * len(columns)
index   = df.index[-step:]

frame = pd.DataFrame(index=df.index[-step:])
for i, pos in enumerate(range(df.values.size-size, -1, -step)):
    cols = columns if i == 0 else map(lambda x: '%s_%s' % (x, i), columns)
    new_frame = pd.DataFrame(values[pos:pos+size].reshape((step, len(columns))),
                             index=index, columns=cols)
    frame = pd.concat([frame, new_frame], axis=1)
print(frame)

Which gives:

             A   B   C   D  A_1  B_1  C_1  D_1  A_2  B_2  C_2  D_2
2013-01-03   8   9  10  11    4    5    6    7    0    1    2    3
2013-01-04  12  13  14  15    8    9   10   11    4    5    6    7
2013-01-05  16  17  18  19   12   13   14   15    8    9   10   11
2013-01-06  20  21  22  23   16   17   18   19   12   13   14   15
share|improve this answer
    
reason user might think they want to do this is to write their own rolling functions (rather than use pandas rolling functions, or a rolling_apply)... they really shouldn't (see my answer). –  Andy Hayden Aug 27 '13 at 11:14
    
@AndyHayden If that's the case I completely agree. But he explicitly stated that he wants a rolling reshape :-/ That's why I asked him why. –  Viktor Kerkez Aug 27 '13 at 11:16
    
There is never a reason to do this. –  Andy Hayden Aug 27 '13 at 11:54

Pandas has a wealth of rolling computational functions which mean you shouldn't be doing this. These will be substantially more efficient (as well as easier to reason about).

Function               Description
rolling_count          Number of non-null observations
rolling_sum            Sum of values
rolling_mean           Mean of values
rolling_median         Arithmetic median of values
rolling_min            Minimum
rolling_max            Maximum
rolling_std            Unbiased standard deviation
rolling_var            Unbiased variance
rolling_skew           Unbiased skewness (3rd moment)
rolling_kurt           Unbiased kurtosis (4th moment)
rolling_quantile       Sample quantile (value at %)
rolling_apply          Generic apply
rolling_cov            Unbiased covariance (binary)
rolling_corr           Correlation (binary)
rolling_corr_pairwise  Pairwise correlation of DataFrame columns
rolling_window         Moving window function

If your final game plan involves doing on of these... just use these. If it's something else, consider writing it as a generic rolling apply.

As an example, here's a rolling_mean with the same window you used:
i.e. the calculation is done on each row and the previous two rows.

In [11]: df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.randn(24).reshape([6,4]),
                           index=dates,columns=list('ABCD'))

In [12]: df
Out[12]:
                   A         B         C         D
2013-01-01  0.225416 -1.014222  0.724756 -0.594679
2013-01-02  1.629553 -1.100808  1.279953 -0.058152
2013-01-03 -0.633830  0.019230 -0.477937 -0.852657
2013-01-04 -0.601511  0.704212 -1.535412 -1.044537
2013-01-05 -0.587404 -1.124893  0.834233  0.117244
2013-01-06 -0.067674 -0.745053  0.589823 -1.007093

In [13]: pd.rolling_mean(df, 3)
Out[13]:
                   A         B         C         D
2013-01-01       NaN       NaN       NaN       NaN
2013-01-02       NaN       NaN       NaN       NaN
2013-01-03  0.407046 -0.698600  0.508924 -0.501829
2013-01-04  0.131404 -0.125788 -0.244465 -0.651782
2013-01-05 -0.607582 -0.133817 -0.393039 -0.593317
2013-01-06 -0.418863 -0.388578 -0.037119 -0.644795

Note: you can also set the freq to be a DateOffset (e.g days, minutes, hours, etc.), which would be more difficult to do with a reshape, and this gives you lots of flexibility.

See the docs for more examples, and how to write generic applies.

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I would duplicate twice your original dataframe, then in the first copy (df1) delete first two rows, in the second (df2) delete first row. Then merge columns from these three dataframe in this order: df1.A .. df1.D df2.A .. df2.D df.A .. df.D

sorrt for no real code, I'm writing from my phone

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