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Assume I have a "make_members" method like this.

sub make_members {  
    my ($number_members) = @_;
    my $rows = SomeDBIModule->select(); 
    my $count = @$rows;             
    for ( my $i = $count + 1; $i < $count + 1 + $number_members; $i++ ) {
          $rows->insert(
              name => "name".$i, 
              type => "A",
              created_at => time,                 
         );                    
   }                                                        
 } 

So far so good. Now imagine the method can take as input, the number of users type a, type b and type c that its desired:

sub make_members {  
    my ($number_members, $n_members_type_a, $n_members_type_b, $n_members_type_c) = @_;
    #....

To write this what first comes to my mind is to make 3 loops. The first one

     for ( my $i = $count + 1; $i < $count + 1 + $n_members_type_a; $i++ ){
          $rows->insert(
              name => "name".$i, 
              type => "A",
      #....

The second one between $count + 1 and $n_members_type_b. The third one between $count + 1 and $n_members_type_c.

That just looks too long and awful. Is there a better way of writing this?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

“Three or more, use a for”.

Just pack it inside another loop

sub make_members {
  my %number_members_for_type;
  @number_members_for_type{qw/A B C/} = @_;
  my $rows = ...;
  while (my ($type, $num) = each %number_members_for_type) {
    for my $i ( @$rows + 1 .. @$rows + $num ) {
      $rows->insert(
        name => "name$i",
        type => $type,
        ...
      )
    }
  }
}

This assumes it is called like make_members($n_type_a, $n_type_b, $n_type_c).

Using a hash for the arguments lets this scale nicely.

We can generalize this if a hash is passed as argument. If the name property has to be an unique ID, and insertions are only done by this function, then we can manage that elegantly as well:

sub make_inserter {
  my ($rows) = @_;
  my $id_counter = @$rows;
  return sub {
    my %type2nums = @_;
    while (my ($type, $num) = each %type2nums) {
      for my $i ($id_counter + 1 .. $id_counter + $num) {
        $rows->insert(
          name => "name$i",
          type => $type,
          ...
        );
      }
      $id_counter += $num;
    }
  };
}

...

# Careful! Do not make an inserter for the same handle twice!
my $make_members = make_inserter(SomeDBIModule->select);
$make_members->(A => 2, B => 3);

If the order of the keys is important, we should rather do this, because the order of hash keys is undefined:

  ... # as before
  return sub {
    while (my ($type, $num) = splice @_, 0, 2) {
      ... # as before
    }
  };
share|improve this answer
    
thanks. So the input of make_members is a hash right? E.g. make_members (+{ A => 1, B => 3, C => 5 }); –  ado Aug 28 '13 at 4:45
    
i also couldnt help but noticing that with this answer, if there are 2 ypes A and 3 types B, the names for types A would be name1, name2 and the names for type B would be name1, name2, name3... If say name is a primary key, that would give an error. $name$i is valid if $i never goes back, but here $i goes back once a loop is over and another one starts –  ado Aug 28 '13 at 5:03
    
@adriancdperu I updated with another solution that you may like more. This allows you to pass in a flat key-value list, and solves the problem of recurring names. It uses an anonymous function, which is a so-called closure over the $id_counter variable –  amon Aug 28 '13 at 7:00
    
awesome code thanks a lot! –  ado Aug 28 '13 at 8:43

Repeating many similar params to a method is often a sign that there is some simplification possible.

So instead of taking a list of numbers, accept the type as a parameter:

sub make_members {  
    my ($number_members, $member_type) = @_;

and later:

$rows->insert(
              name => "name".$i, 
              type => $member_type,
              created_at => time,                 
         );

Then factor calling code appropriately. For instance to create x times "A", y times "B", z times "C":

%numbers_of = ( "A" => 4, "B" => 5, "C" => 2 );
for my $type (keys %numbers_of) {
    make_members( $numbers_of{ $type }, $type );
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ah, this doesn't work because of embedded scoped counter in the make_members method, which means you can only call the routine once. I'd probably factor that out too, a routine you can only call once safely is going to cause you a headache at some point. However, it becomes a more delicate decision, based on what the rest of the code does. –  Neil Slater Aug 27 '13 at 7:33

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