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I have the following data set. I would like to use python or gnuplot to plot the data. The tuples are of the form (x,y). The Y axis should be a log axis. I.E. log(y). A scatter plot or line plot would be ideal.

How can this be done?

 [(0, 6.0705199999997801e-08), (1, 2.1015700100300739e-08), 
 (2, 7.6280656623374823e-09), (3, 5.7348209304555086e-09), 
 (4, 3.6812203579604238e-09), (5, 4.1572516753310418e-09)]
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If I get your question correctly, you could do something like this.

>>> import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
>>> testList =[(0, 6.0705199999997801e-08), (1, 2.1015700100300739e-08), 
 (2, 7.6280656623374823e-09), (3, 5.7348209304555086e-09), 
 (4, 3.6812203579604238e-09), (5, 4.1572516753310418e-09)]
>>> from math import log
>>> testList2 = [(elem1, log(elem2)) for elem1, elem2 in testList]
>>> testList2
[(0, -16.617236475334405), (1, -17.67799605473062), (2, -18.691431541177973), (3, -18.9767093108359), (4, -19.420021520728017), (5, -19.298411635970396)]
>>> zip(*testList2)
[(0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5), (-16.617236475334405, -17.67799605473062, -18.691431541177973, -18.9767093108359, -19.420021520728017, -19.298411635970396)]
>>> plt.scatter(*zip(*testList2))
>>> plt.show()

which would give you something like

enter image description here

Or as a line plot,

>>> plt.plot(*zip(*testList2))
>>> plt.show()

enter image description here

EDIT - If you want to add a title and labels for the axis, you could do something like

>>> plt.scatter(*zip(*testList2))
>>> plt.title('Random Figure')
>>> plt.xlabel('X-Axis')
>>> plt.ylabel('Y-Axis')
>>> plt.show()

which would give you

enter image description here

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1  
How do I add a title and label axis? –  olliepower Aug 27 '13 at 7:09
1  
@olliepower : Check the edit. :) –  Sukrit Kalra Aug 27 '13 at 7:14
    
OP asked was unclear whether wanting log axis on y or wanting y-coordinates to be log(y_data). You could use plt.semilogy() instead of plt.plot(). –  BBrown Feb 21 at 1:39

In matplotlib it would be:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

data =  [(0, 6.0705199999997801e-08), (1, 2.1015700100300739e-08),
 (2, 7.6280656623374823e-09), (3, 5.7348209304555086e-09),
 (4, 3.6812203579604238e-09), (5, 4.1572516753310418e-09)]

x_val = [x[0] for x in data]
y_val = [x[1] for x in data]

print x_val
plt.plot(x_val,y_val)
plt.plot(x_val,y_val,'or')
plt.show()

which would produce:

enter image description here

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OP asked for y-axis to be logarithmic. Use plt.yscale('log') for pyplot interactive mode. –  BBrown Feb 21 at 1:34

As others have answered, scatter() or plot() will generate the plot you want. I suggest two refinements to answers that are already here:

  1. Use numpy to create the x-coordinate list and y-coordinate list. Working with large data sets is faster in numpy than using the iteration in Python suggested in other answers.

  2. Use pyplot to apply the logarithmic scale rather than operating directly on the data, unless you actually want to have the logs.

    import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
    import numpy as np
    
    data = [(2, 10), (3, 100), (4, 1000), (5, 100000)]
    data_in_array = np.array(data)
    '''
    That looks like array([[     2,     10],
                           [     3,    100],
                           [     4,   1000],
                           [     5, 100000]])
    '''
    
    transposed = data_in_array.T
    '''
    That looks like array([[     2,      3,      4,      5],
                           [    10,    100,   1000, 100000]])
    '''    
    
    x, y = transposed 
    
    # Here is the OO method
    # You could also the state-based methods of pyplot
    fig, ax = plt.subplots(1,1) # gets a handle for the AxesSubplot object
    ax.plot(x, y, 'ro')
    ax.plot(x, y, 'b-')
    ax.set_yscale('log')
    fig.show()
    

result

I've also used ax.set_xlim(1, 6) and ax.set_ylim(.1, 1e6) to make it pretty.

Instead of the OO method, you could use the interactive mode.

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