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I have this XML data and try and make a sum of it using the XSLT snippet below.

Xml

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<values>
    <value>159.14</value>
    <value>-2572.50</value>
    <value>-2572.50</value>
    <value>2572.50</value>
    <value>2572.50</value>
    <value>-159.14</value>
</values>

Xslt

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
    xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">

<xsl:template match="/">
    <xsl:value-of select="sum(values/value)"/>
</xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>

In my world the value should then be 0 but it ends up being -0.0000000000005684341886080801

Run it in Visual Studio and see for yourself. Why? is this happening?

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1  
Just to add a little completeness to the solution given below below and answer your question of "Why?" Check out "What Every Computer Scientist should know about Floating-Point Arithmetic" docs.sun.com/source/806-3568/ncg_goldberg.html –  LorenVS Dec 4 '09 at 10:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Seems your XSLT processor convert decimal numbers strings to float-point precision numbers before sum;

Well, you can always to use round function and divide by your desired precision or to use format-number function, if available:

<xsl:template match="/">
    <xsl:value-of select="round(sum(values/value)) div 100"/><br />
    <xsl:value-of select="format-number(sum(values/value), '0.00')"/>
</xsl:template>
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1  
@Riri: If you are surprised about this behavior, I think this: stackoverflow.com/questions/249467/… and the linked page in the accepted answer is worth a read. –  Tomalak Dec 4 '09 at 10:21

Try this

<xsl:value-of select="format-number(sum(values/value),'0.00')"/>
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How about adding round?

round(sum(values/value))
share|improve this answer
    
Sure that solves it - but why is it happening? –  Riri Dec 4 '09 at 10:10
    
Posted the same comment above, but it feels in place here as well. Just to add a little completeness to the solution given below below and answer your question of "Why?" Check out "What Every Computer Scientist should know about Floating-Point Arithmetic" docs.sun.com/source/806-3568/ncg%5Fgoldberg.html –  LorenVS Dec 4 '09 at 10:12

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