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Consider the following two ways of writing a loop in Java to see if a list contains a given value:

Style 1

boolean found = false;
for(int i = 0; i < list.length && !found; i++)
{
   if(list[i] == testVal)
     found = true;
}

Style 2

boolean found = false;
for(int i = 0; i < list.length && !found; i++)
{
   found = (list[i] == testVal);
}

The two are equivalent, but I always use style 1 because 1) I find it more readable, and 2) I am assuming that reassigning found to false hundreds of times feels like it would take more time. I am wondering: is this second assumption true?

Nitpicker's corner

  • I am well aware that this is a case of premature optimization. That doesn't mean that it isn't something that is useful to know.
  • I don't care which style you think is more readable. I am only interested in whether one has a performance penalty compared to the other.
  • I know that style 1 has the advantage of allowing you to also put a break; statement in the if block, but I don't care. Again, this question is about performance, not style.
share|improve this question
    
You may want to state what language you're interested in. C, C++, Java, .NET? –  JesperE Oct 8 '08 at 20:07
    
it's java. added it to the question. –  Kip Oct 8 '08 at 20:13
    
On nitpicker's corner #3, you say, "Again, this question is about performance, not style." Seems to me that putting a break into the first style is likely to affect performance quite a bit. –  Michael Myers Oct 8 '08 at 21:10
    
mmyers: I thought that at first as well, but !found is part of the looping condition, so it is a trivial performance increase. –  MetroidFan2002 Oct 9 '08 at 4:43
    
Ah, didn't notice that. I saw the loop and thought "iterate through array" without even looking at the condition. :) –  Michael Myers Oct 9 '08 at 14:04

13 Answers 13

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Well, just write a micro benchmark:

import java.util.*;

public class Test {
    private static int[] list = new int[] {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9} ;
    private static int testVal = 6;


    public static boolean version1() {
        boolean found = false;
        for(int i = 0; i < list.length && !found; i++)
        {
    	if(list[i] == testVal)
    	    found = true;
        }
        return found;

    }

    public static boolean version2() {
    boolean found = false;
    for(int i = 0; i < list.length && !found; i++)
        {
    	found = (list[i] == testVal);
        }

    return found;
    }


    public static void main(String[] args) {

        // warm up
    for (int i=0; i<100000000; i++) {
        version1();
        version2();
    }


    long time = System.currentTimeMillis();
    for (int i=0; i<100000000; i++) {
        version1();
    }

    System.out.println("Version1:" + (System.currentTimeMillis() - time));

    time = System.currentTimeMillis();
    for (int i=0; i@lt;100000000; i++) {
        version2();
    }

        System.out.println("Version2:" + (System.currentTimeMillis() - time));
    }
}

On my machine version1 seems to be a little bit faster:

Version1:5236

Version2:5477

(But that's 0.2 seconds on a 100 million iterations. I wouldn't care about this.)

If you look at the generated bytecode there are two more instructions in version2 which probably cause the longer execution time:

public static boolean version1();
  Code:
   0:   iconst_0
   1:   istore_0
   2:   iconst_0
   3:   istore_1
   4:   iload_1
   5:   getstatic	#2; //Field list:[I
   8:   arraylength
   9:   if_icmpge	35
   12:  iload_0
   13:  ifne	35
   16:  getstatic	#2; //Field list:[I
   19:  iload_1
   20:  iaload
   21:  getstatic	#3; //Field testVal:I
   24:  if_icmpne	29
   27:  iconst_1
   28:  istore_0
   29:  iinc	1, 1
   32:  goto	4
   35:  iload_0
   36:  ireturn

public static boolean version2();
  Code:
   0:   iconst_0
   1:   istore_0
   2:   iconst_0
   3:   istore_1
   4:   iload_1
   5:   getstatic	#2; //Field list:[I
   8:   arraylength
   9:   if_icmpge	39
   12:  iload_0
   13:  ifne	39
   16:  getstatic	#2; //Field list:[I
   19:  iload_1
   20:  iaload
   21:  getstatic	#3; //Field testVal:I
   24:  if_icmpne	31
   27:  iconst_1
   28:  goto	32
   31:  iconst_0
   32:  istore_0
   33:  iinc	1, 1
   36:  goto	4
   39:  iload_0
   40:  ireturn
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I guess I'm just too lazy to actually benchmark it myself. :) –  Kip Oct 13 '08 at 1:31

Comment about nitpicks corner:

If you're really concerned with absolute performance, putting a break in and removing the "&& !found" will give you theoretically better performance on #1. Two less binary ops to worry about every iteration.

If you wanted to get really anal about optimization without using breaks then

boolean notFound = true;
    for(int i = 0; notFound && i < list.length; i++)
    {
       if(list[i] == testVal)
         notFound = false;
    }

will run faster in the average case than the existing option #1.

And of course it's personal preference, but I prefer to never put any extra evaluations inside the head of a for loop. I find it can cause confusion while reading code, because it's easy to miss. If I can't get the desired behavior using break/continues I will use a while or do/while loop instead.

share|improve this answer

Actually, the "if" will slow your program down more than assignment due to the pipeline.

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But branch prediction may or may not compensate for that. –  JesperE Oct 8 '08 at 20:15

It depends on what compiler you use since different compilers might do different optimizations.

share|improve this answer

I believe style 2 is ever-so-slightly faster - say 1 clock cycle or so.

I'd rewrite it into the following, though, if I were tackling it:

for(i=0; i<list.length && list[i]!=testval; i++);
boolean found = (i!=list.length);
share|improve this answer
    
I don't think that'd work. If the item is at the beginning of the list, i would = 0, and found would = false. –  Mark Brackett Oct 8 '08 at 20:13
    
you're right - it needs to be negated. –  warren Oct 8 '08 at 20:15

It seems to me that if you expect your value to be found before the end of the list, you'd be better off with #2 - as it short circuits the check with !found in the loop conditional. Assuming you put a break in, the 1st option (the only sensible thing, IMO), then pseudo assembly would look something like:

Option 1:

start:
  CMP i, list.length
  JE end
  CMP list[i], testval
  JE equal
  JMP start
equal:
  MOV true, found
end:

Option 2:

start:
  CMP i, list.length
  JE end
  CMP true, found
  JE end
  CMP list[i], testval
  JE equal
  JNE notequal
equal:
  MOV true, found
  JMP start
notequal:
  MOV false, found
  JMP start
end:

I'd say Option 1 is superior here, as it's about 1/3rd less instructions. Of course, this is without optimizations - but that'd be compiler and situation specific (what is found doing after this? can we just optimize it away all together?).

share|improve this answer

Here is another style

for(int i = 0; i < list.length; i++)
{
   if(list[i] == testVal)
     return true;
}

return false;
share|improve this answer

I think both alternatives leave something to be desired, from a performance point of view.

Think about how many tests (which are almost always jumps) you do per iteration, and try to minimize the amount.

The solution by Matt, to return out when the answer is found, reduces the number of tests from three (loop iterator, found-test in loop, actual comparison) to two. Doing the "found"-test essentially twice is wasteful.

I'm not sure if the classic, but somewhat obfuscating, trick of looping backwards is a win in Java, and not hot enough at reading JVM code to figure it out right now, either.

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I would say that in 98% of systems, it does not matter. The difference, if there is any, is hardly noticeable unless that loop is the main portion of code and is running a mindnumbing number of times.

Edit: That is ofcourse assuming that it is not being already optimized by the compiler.

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Any decent compiler would keep found in a register for a duration of the loop and so the cost is absolutely negligible.

If the second style is done without a branch then it would be preferable, since the CPU's pipeline will not get disrupted as much ... but that depends on how the compiler uses the instruction set.

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This will only be measurable in code which is extremely performance-sensitive (simulators, emulators, video encoding software, etc.) in which case you probably want to manually inspect the generated code anyway to make sure that the compiler actually generates sensible code.

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To be sure, you should compile both versions (say with latest compiler from Sun) and examine the generated bytecode with an appropriate tool... That's the only reliable way to know for sure, everything else is wild guess.

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boolean found = false;
for(int i = 0; i < list.length && !found; i++)
{
   if(list[i] == testVal)
     found = true;
}

I don't see a break statement in the block.

Other than that, I prefer this style. It improves readability and thereby the chance that a maintainer mis-reading and mis-fixing it.

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