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x <- seq(-50, 50, 0.01)
xy <- data.frame(x=x, y=dnorm(1:length(x), 5000, 1500))
ggplot(data=xy) + geom_line(aes(x=x, y=y), size=3, fill="black", color="black")

At first it looks ok, but when I zoom in can see little white gaps between segments that make up the line.

How can I get rid of those white gaps which can be annoying particularly when there another overlapping layer of plot below the line which has a different color?

Here are the links that show original and zoomed plots captured from a Quartz window on a Mac:

Original: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/3614574/ggplotOriginal.jpg Zoomed: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/3614574/ggplotZoomed.jpg

I use ggplot2 ver. 0.9.3.1 Sys.info() "Darwin" release "11.4.2" version "Darwin Kernel Version 11.4.2: Thu Aug 23 16:25:48 PDT 2012; root:xnu-1699.32.7~1/RELEASE_X86_64"

share|improve this question
    
I don't see any gaps when viewing a pdf (saved using ggsave) at up to 6400 %. – Roland Aug 27 '13 at 11:47
    
Checked with ggsave and found no gaps. Seems Quartz rendering issue. Wonder why. – arman Aug 27 '13 at 11:54
    
I guess this is related with your pdf viewer. I have the similar problem with geom_tile. The white lines could be found with PDF Xchange viewer even using the original size, but no lines in Adobe reader. – Bangyou Aug 27 '13 at 12:05
    
The linked plots are screen grabs from a Quartz window. I usually don't ggsave but prefer copying/pasting from a Quartz window, which provides PDF objects when pasted into a vector graphics editor. But it seems Quartz is failing to render this plot correctly for a reason that I don't yet understand. – arman Aug 27 '13 at 12:17

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