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I want to split the string into integers and operators for doing Infix expression evaluation in python.

Here is my string:

>>> s = (1-2+3)*5+10/2

I tried this to split:

>>>list(s)
['(', '1', '-', '2', '+', '3', ')', '*', '5', '+', '1', '0', '/', '2']

This is wrong. Since '10' is splitted into '1','0'

I tried alternative:

>>> re.findall('[+-/*//()]+|\d+',s)
['(', '1', '-', '2', '+', '3', ')*', '5', '+', '10', '/', '2']

This is also went wrong. Since ')*' should be splitted into ')', '*'

Could you help to split the operators and integers from the given expression?

share|improve this question
    
This is not the right way to parse mathematical expressions. –  Sniffer Aug 27 '13 at 11:45
    
@Sniffer Could you point out what is the right way? –  flornquake Aug 27 '13 at 11:50
    
s is not a string right now, anyway... –  Jblasco Aug 27 '13 at 11:50
    
@flornquake Check the link pointed to by badc0re in his answer below. –  Sniffer Aug 27 '13 at 11:52

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is not the best solution for infix. Remove the + after [] like:

import re
s = "(1-2+3)*5+10/2"
print re.findall('[+-/*//()]|\d+',s)

['(', '1', '-', '2', '+', '3', ')', '*', '5', '+', '10', '/', '2']

Try the following link for correct solution: Simple Balanced Parentheses

from pythonds.basic.stack import Stack

def postfixEval(postfixExpr):
    operandStack = Stack()
    tokenList = postfixExpr.split()

    for token in tokenList:
        if token in "0123456789":
            operandStack.push(int(token))
        else:
            operand2 = operandStack.pop()
            operand1 = operandStack.pop()
            result = doMath(token,operand1,operand2)
            operandStack.push(result)
    return operandStack.pop()

def doMath(op, op1, op2):
    if op == "*":
        return op1 * op2
    elif op == "/":
        return op1 / op2
    elif op == "+":
        return op1 + op2
    else:
        return op1 - op2

print(postfixEval('7 8 + 3 2 + /'))

Keep in mind that this is a postfix implementation and its just for example. Do the infix by yourself and if you have any difficulties just ask.

share|improve this answer
    
In this link what i get is push the each character inside stack,and pop out the elements after reached closed parenthesis until open parenthesis..We are doing also the same..before that we have to split the expression, so this way being proposed, for splitting the expression into characters do you have alternate idea, before going to stacking? –  Navaneethan Aug 27 '13 at 13:48
    
Why use an external stack library, when a Python list will suffice? Just replace Stack() by [] and .push by .append. –  nneonneo Aug 27 '13 at 13:52
    
This is the implementation from the book, it is not mine. –  badc0re Aug 27 '13 at 13:52
    
yeah..i understand it..Just want to do some extra statements and methods..so it came in the way..Here I posted my own implementation with some help .please take a look and give your feedback ..Thanks in advance..bitbucket.org/nava/utilities/src/… –  Navaneethan Aug 27 '13 at 13:58
    
It doesn't seems to have any problems in the calculations, but i don't get what is the purpose of "if operator.div in l" -> line 49 –  badc0re Aug 27 '13 at 14:05

Try

re.findall('[+-/*//()]|\d+',s)

You don't need the +, since you only want to have one special sign.

share|improve this answer

Using split:

print filter(lambda x: x, re.split(r'([-+*/()])|\s+', s))
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If you can avoid regular expressions, you can try an iterative solution (just a rough code):

s = "(1-2+3)*5+10/2"
numbers = "0123456789."

def split_operators(s):
    l = []
    last_number = ""
    for c in s:
        if c in numbers:
            last_number += c
        else:
            if last_number:
                l.append(last_number)
                last_number = ""
            if c:
                l.append(c)
    if last_number:
        l.append(last_number)
    return l

print split_operators(s)

result:

['(', '1', '-', '2', '+', '3', ')', '*', '5', '+', '10', '/', '2']
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