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I have a bunch of Lua 5.1 files that have this (or similar) construct inside:

...
local alpha, 
      beta
      = FUNCTION "gamma"
      {
        'delta',
        'epsilon'
      }
...

That is, a call to the FUNCTION that returns a function that returns some values, that are assigned to some local variables, declared at the spot.

Exact code may vary somewhat — both in style (say, everything may be on the same line), and in content (say, there can be zero arguments passed to the second function call). But always things start with local, and end with two chained function calls.

I've got a line number for FUNCTION call. I need to find the end of the last function call in the chain (this particular one; there can be more FUNCTION calls somewhere further in the file), and remove all file content upwards from that point.

I.e., before:

print("foo") -- 01
local alpha = FUNCTION 'beta' -- 02
{ "gamma" } -- 03
print("bar") -- 04

after:

 -- 03
print("bar") -- 04

Any clues on how to approach this?


Update:

To be more clear on why naïve regexp approach wouldn't work, a real life example:

local alpha
      = FUNCTION ( -- my line number points here
          FUNCTION 'beta' { 'gamma' } ()
            and 'epsilon'
             or 'zeta'
        )
      {
        'eta'
      } -- should be cut from here and above as a result
share|improve this question
    
I'm not sure what you mean, but does gsub("^.-local.-FUNCTION.-}","" work for you? –  lhf Aug 27 '13 at 12:24
    
What about the case when FUNCTION call will have parentheses? Or when it will be split to several lines? Or when I'll have several FUNCTION calls per file, and will need to remove middle one? (I assume that ^ anchors on the beginning of the file?) –  Alexander Gladysh Aug 27 '13 at 12:55
    
I've updated the question with a real life example to illustrate this. –  Alexander Gladysh Aug 27 '13 at 18:55

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Main idea: search for adjacent tits ()() !

local line_no = 12
local str = [[
print("foo")
local nif_nif
      = FUNCTION (
          FUNCTION 'beta' { 'gamma' } ()
            and 'epsilon'
             or 'zeta'
        )
      {
        'eta'
      }
local nuf_nuf
      = FUNCTION (      -- this is line#12
          FUNCTION 'beta' { 'gamma' } ()
            and 'epsilon'
             or 'zeta'
        )
      {
        'eta'
      }                 -- should be cut from here
local naf_naf
      = FUNCTION (
          FUNCTION 'beta' { 'gamma' } ()
            and 'epsilon'
             or 'zeta'
        )
      {
        'eta'
      }
print("bar")
]]

-- cut all text before target "local" keyword
str = str:gsub('\n','\0',line_no):gsub('^.*(local.-%z)','%1'):gsub('%z','\n')

-- enclose string literals and table constructors into temporary parentheses
str = str:gsub('%b""','(\0%0\0)')
         :gsub("%b''",'(\0%0\0)')
         :gsub("%b{}",'(\0%0\0)')

-- replace text in parentheses with links to it
local n, t = 0, {}
str = str:gsub('%b()', function(s) n=n+1 t[n..'']=s return'<\0'..n..'>' end)

-- search for first chained function call and cut it out
str = str:gsub('^.-<%z%d+>%s*<%z%d+>', '')
repeat
  local ctr
  str, ctr = str:gsub('^%s*<%z%d+>', '')
until ctr == 0

-- replace links with original text
t, str = nil, str:gsub('<%z(%d+)>', t)

-- remove temporary parentheses
str = str:gsub('%(%z', ''):gsub('%z%)', '')

print(str)

Output:

                 -- should be cut from here
local naf_naf
      = FUNCTION (
          FUNCTION 'beta' { 'gamma' } ()
            and 'epsilon'
             or 'zeta'
        )
      {
        'eta'
      }
print("bar")
share|improve this answer
    
Wouldn't work for two FUNCTION in a row if you need to cut off only first one. I.e. try repeating whole local alpha ... } construct twice. –  Alexander Gladysh Aug 27 '13 at 20:04
    
1  
Yes, this idea should be elaborated to use line number as input. –  Egor Skriptunoff Aug 27 '13 at 20:08
    
"@AlexanderGladysh - Code updated to work with line_no input parameter. –  Egor Skriptunoff Aug 31 '13 at 13:37

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