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I am sure this is a basic question but I haven't been able to find whether or not this is a legitimate memory allocation strategy or not. I am reading in data from a file and I am filling in a struct. The size of the members are variable on each read so my struct elements are pointers like so

struct data_channel{
    char *chan_name;
    char *chan_type;
    char *chan_units;
};

So before reading I figure out what the size of each string is so I can allocate memory for them my question is can I allocate the memory for the struct and the strings all in one malloc and then fill the pointer in?

Say the size of chan_name is 9, chan_type 10, and chan_units 5. So I would allocate the and do something like this.

struct data_channel *chan;

chan = malloc(sizeof(struct data_channel) + 9 + 10 + 5);
chan->chan_name = chan[1];
chan->chan_type = chan->chan_name + 9;
chan->chan_units = chan->chan_type + 10;

So I read a couple of articles on memory alignment but I don't know if doing the above is a problem or not or what kind of unintended consequences it could have. I have already implemented it in my code and it seems to work fine. I just don't want to have to keep track of all those pointers because in reality each of my structs has 7 elements and I could have upwards of 100 channels. That of course means 700 pointers plus the pointers for each struct so total 800. The I also have to devise a way to free them all. I also want to apply this strategy to arrays of strings of which I then need to have an array of pointers to. I don't have any structures right now that would mix data types could that be a problem but I might could that be a problem?

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There's one obvious error, that will cause the code to not compile. –  Joachim Pileborg Aug 27 '13 at 13:10
    
@JoachimPileborg - you mean chan not being an array? –  Martin James Aug 27 '13 at 13:12
    
That looks really dangerous and non-portable. I'd just build an allocation routine (for the structure) and a freeing routine (for the structure) and be done with it. You have to allocate and free it anyway, so just encapsulate away the extra pointers you don't want to deal with. –  Jiminion Aug 27 '13 at 13:13
    
@MartinJames No, that the OP should use &char[1] instead. And typecast it to the correct type. –  Joachim Pileborg Aug 27 '13 at 13:14
    
I can't see much point in the pointers? Why can you not just shove the char arrays into data_channel? –  Martin James Aug 27 '13 at 13:14

4 Answers 4

If chan_name is a 8 character string, chan_type is a 9 character string and chan_units is a 4 character string, then yes it will work fine when you fix the compilation error you have when assigning to chan_name.

If you allocate enough memory for the structure plus all the strings (including their string terminator) then it's okay to use such a method. Maybe not recommended by all, but it will work.

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1  
+1. If you have other types than char then there may be memory alignment issues and that is the reason why most people will avoid using this method. –  Klas Lindbäck Aug 27 '13 at 13:26

It depends in part on the element types. You will certainly be able to do it with character strings; with some other types, you have to worry about alignment and padding issues.

struct data_channel
{
    char *chan_name;
    char *chan_type;
    char *chan_units;
};

struct data_channel *chan;
size_t name_size = 9;
size_t type_size = 10;
size_t unit_size = 5;

chan = malloc(sizeof(struct data_channel) + name_size + type_size + unit_size);
if (chan != 0)
{
    chan->chan_name  = (char *)chan + sizeof(*chan);
    chan->chan_type  = chan->chan_name + name_size;
    chan->chan_units = chan->chan_type + type_size;
}

This will work OK in practice — it was being done for ages before the standard was standardized. I can't immediately see why the standard would disallow this.

What gets trickier is if you needed to allocate an array of int, say, as well as two strings. Then you have to worry about alignment issues.

struct data_info
{
    char *info_name;
    int  *info_freq;
    char *info_unit;
};

size_t name_size = 9;
size_t freq_size = 10;
size_t unit_size = 5;
size_t nbytes = sizeof(struct data_info) + name_size + freq_size * sizeof(int) + unit_size;
struct data_info *info = malloc(nbytes);

if (info != 0)
{
    info->info_freq = (int *)((char *)info + sizeof(*info));
    info->info_name = (char *)info->info_freq + freq_size * sizeof(int);
    info->info_unit = info->info_name + name_size;
}

This has adopted the simple expedient of allocating the most stringently aligned type (the array of int) first, then allocating the strings afterwards. This part is, however, where you have to make judgement calls about portability. I'm confident that the code is portable in practice.

C11 has alignment facilities (_Alignof and _Alignas and <stdalign.h>, plus max_align_t in <stddef.h>) that could alter this answer (but I've not studied them sufficiently so I'm not sure how, yet), but the techniques outlined here will work in any version of C provided you are careful about the alignment of data.

Note that if you have a single array in the structure, then C99 provides an alternative to the older 'struct hack' called a flexible array member (FAM). This allows you to have an array explicitly as the last element of the structure.

    struct data_info
    {
        char *info_name;
        char *info_units;
        int  info_freq[];
    };

    size_t name_size = 9;
    size_t freq_size = 10;
    size_t unit_size = 5;
    size_t nbytes = sizeof(struct data_info) + name_size + freq_size * sizeof(int) + unit_size;
    struct data_info *info = malloc(nbytes);

    if (info != 0)
    {
        info->info_name  = ((char *)info + sizeof(*info) + freq_size * sizeof(int));
        info->info_units = info->info_name + name_size;
    }

Note that there was no step to initialize the FAM, info_freq in this example. You cannot have multiple arrays like this.

Note that the techniques outlined cannot readily be applied to arrays of structures (at least, arrays of the outer structure). If you go to considerable effort, you can make it work. Also, beware of realloc(); if you reallocate space, you have to fix up the pointers if the data has moved.

One other point: especially on 64-bit machines, if the sizes of the strings are uniform enough, you'd probably do better allocating the arrays in the structure, instead of using the pointers.

struct data_channel
{
    char chan_name[16];
    char chan_type[16];
    char chan_units[8];
};

This occupies 40 bytes. On a 64-bit machine, the original data structure would occupy 24 bytes for the three pointers and another 24 bytes for the (9 + 10 + 5) bytes of data, for a total of 48 bytes allocated.

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I know there is a sure way to do this when you have ONE array at the end of a structure, but since all your arrays have the same type, you may be in luck. The sure method is:

#include <stddef.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

struct StWithArray
{
    int blahblah;
    float arr[1];
};
struct StWithArray * AllocWithArray(size_t nb)
{
    size_t size = nb*sizeof(float) + offsetof(structStWithArray, arr);
    return malloc(size);
}

The use of an actual array in the structure guarantees alignment is respected.

Now to apply it to your case:

#include <stddef.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

struct data_channel
{
    char *chan_name;
    char *chan_type;
    char *chan_units;

    char actualCharArray[1];
};

struct data_channel * AllocDataChannel(size_t nb)
{
    size_t size = nb*sizeof(char) + offsetof(data_channel, actualCharArray);
    return malloc(size);
}
struct data_channel * CreateDataChannel(size_t length1, size_t length2, size_t length3)
{
    struct data_channel * pt = AllocDataChannel(length1 + length2 + length3);
    if(pt != NULL)
    {
        pt->chan_name = &pt->actualCharArray[0];
        pt->chan_type = &pt->actualCharArray[length1];
        pt->chan_name = &pt->actualCharArray[length1+length2];
    }
    return pt;
}
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+1 because it will work regardless of alignment. –  Klas Lindbäck Aug 27 '13 at 13:32
    
This is using the pre-C99 'struct hack'. It still works in practice. –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 27 '13 at 16:01

Joachim and Jonathan's answers are nice. Only addition I would like to mention is this.

Separate mallocs and frees buy you some basic protection like buffer overrun, access after free, etc. I mean basic and not Valgrind like features. Allocating one single chunk and internally doling it out will lead to a loss of this feature.

In future, if the mallocs are for different sizes totally, then separate mallocs may buy you the efficiency of coming from different allocation buckets inside of the malloc implementation, especially if you are going to free them at different times.

The last thing you have to consider is how frequently you are calling mallocs. If it is frequent, then cost of multiple mallocs can be costly.

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