Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a model Lap:

class Lap < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :car

  def self.by_carmodel(carmodel)
    scoped = joins(:car_model).where(:car_models => {:name => carmodel})
    scoped
  end

  def self.fastest_per_car
    scoped = select("laps.id",:car_id, :time, :mph).group("laps.id", :car_id, :time, :mph).order("time").limit(1)
    scoped
  end
end

I want to only return the fastest lap for each car.

So, I need to group the Laps by the Lap.car_id and then only return the fastest lap time based on that car, which would determined by the column Lap.time

Basically I would like to stack my methods in my controller:

@corvettes = Lap.by_carmodel("Corvette").fastest_per_car

Hopefully that makes sense...

When trying to run just Lap.fastest_per_car I am limiting everything to 1 result, rather than 1 result per each Car.

Another thing I had to do was add "laps.id" as :id was showing up empty in my results as well. If i just select(:id) it was saying ambiguous

share|improve this question
    
How would you want to treat a case where a car had multiple laps that share the fastest time? Return all of them, the earliest, most recent .. ? –  David Aldridge Aug 27 '13 at 16:53
    
I'd probably only want to return the most recent in that case. These times will be like 54.354 so the chances of an exact same will be slim, but could exist. Basically return only fastest time by a said car_id –  Joel Grannas Aug 27 '13 at 17:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think a decent approach to this would be to add a where clause based on an efficient SQL syntax for returning the single fastest lap.

Something like this correlated subquery ...

select ...
from   laps
where  id = (select   id
             from     laps laps_inner
             where    laps_inner.car_id = laps.car_id
             order by time asc,
                      created_at desc
             limit    1)

It's a little complex because of the need to tie-break on created_at.

The rails scope would just be:

where("laps.id = (select   id
                  from     laps laps_inner
                  where    laps_inner.car_id = laps.car_id
                  order by time asc,
                           created_at desc
                  limit    1)")

An index on car_id would be pretty essential, and if that was a composite index on (car_id, time asc) then so much the better.

share|improve this answer
    
works nicely. thank you! –  Joel Grannas Aug 27 '13 at 18:45
    
Can anyone tell me how this could be written with activerecord, rather than sql? Just cause I am curious –  Joel Grannas Aug 27 '13 at 19:06
    
For a pure activerecord approach you'd probably need two steps: one to select each car_id and their respective minimum time, and then another step to accept this list as a set of conditions for retrieving the complete record. That wouldn't take care of the uniqueness in the final result set though -- I'm not sure how you'd approach that without resorting to some kind of SQL override. –  David Aldridge Aug 28 '13 at 13:01
    
Check out my answer below and see if its ok. it seems simpler. –  Joel Grannas Sep 3 '13 at 16:01
    
I wasn't familiar with DISTINCT ON () -- it's not ANSI standard SQL, I think -- but it looks like a great approach. I'd be keen myself to see how well performance holds up for large data sets but I don't see why it shouldn't be fine. Nice one. –  David Aldridge Sep 3 '13 at 16:36

You are using limit which will return you one single value. Not one value per car. To return one car value per lap you just have to join the table and group by a group of columns that will identify one lap (id is the simplest).

Also, you can have a more ActiveRecord friendly friendly with:

class Lap < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :car

  def self.by_carmodel(carmodel)
    joins(:car_model).where(:car_models => {:name => carmodel})
  end

  def self.fastest_per_car
    joins(:car_model)
      .select("laps.*, MIN(car_models.time) AS min_time")
      .group("laps.id")
      .order("min_time ASC")
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
I don't think i need to join the car_model. As I dont need the fastest individual car based on the car_model, but rather a list of the fastest Laps. AND only the fastest Lap by each unique :car_id if that makes sense. So basically I need to get all Laps and order it by time ASC, then group them by car_id, and only pluck out the min(time) for each grouping of car_id's Laps –  Joel Grannas Aug 28 '13 at 12:26
1  
Could you show the taxonomy of your models/tables? –  polmiro Aug 28 '13 at 15:31
    
create_table "laps", force: true do |t| t.decimal "time" t.string "video_url" t.integer "car_id" t.datetime "created_at" t.datetime "updated_at" t.integer "user_id" t.boolean "approved" end –  Joel Grannas Aug 30 '13 at 15:19
    
create_table "cars", force: true do |t| t.text "mods" t.integer "user_id" t.datetime "created_at" t.datetime "updated_at" t.integer "car_make_id" t.integer "car_model_id" t.integer "engine_id" t.integer "transmission_id" t.string "nickname" end –  Joel Grannas Aug 30 '13 at 15:20
    
Couldnt I just do this with two queries? Get all the ID's of the fastest laps per unique car_id ** ids = Lap.order("time").select("DISTINCT car_id") ** then ** Lap.where(:id => ids).order("time") ** –  Joel Grannas Aug 30 '13 at 17:14

This is what I did and its working. If there is a better way to go about these please post your answer:

in my model:

def self.fastest_per_car
    select('DISTINCT ON (car_id) *').order('car_id, time ASC').sort_by! {|ts| ts.time}
end
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.