Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How to determine if object is of type IEnumerable <T>?

Code:

namespace NS {
    class Program {
    	static IEnumerable<int> GetInts() {
    		yield return 1;
    	}
    	static void Main() {
    		var i = GetInts();
    		var type = i.GetType();
    		Console.WriteLine(type.ToString());
    	}
    }
}

Output:

NS.1.Program+<GetInts>d__0

If I change GetInts to return IList, everything is OK the output is:

 System.Collections.Generic.List`1[System.Int32]

And this returns false:

namespace NS {
    class Program {
    	static IEnumerable<int> GetInts() {
    		yield return 1;
    	}
    	static void Main() {
    		var i = GetInts();
    		var type = i.GetType();
    		Console.WriteLine(type.Equals(typeof(IEnumerable<int>)));
    	}
    }
}
share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 56 down vote accepted

If you mean the collection, then just as:

var asEnumerable = i as IEnumerable<int>;
if(asEnumerable != null) { ... }

However, I'm assuming (from the example) that you have a Type:

The object will never be "of" type IEnumerable<int> - but it might implement it; I would expect that:

if(typeof(IEnumerable<int>).IsAssignableFrom(type)) {...}

would do. If you don't know the T (int in the above), then check all the implemented interfaces:

static Type GetEnumerableType(Type type) {
    foreach (Type intType in type.GetInterfaces()) {
        if (intType.IsGenericType
            && intType.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(IEnumerable<>)) {
            return intType.GetGenericArguments()[0];
        }
    }
    return null;
}

and call:

Type t = GetEnumerableType(type);

if this is null, it isn't IEnumerable<T> for any T - otherwise check t.

share|improve this answer
7  
Just remember that System.String implements IEnumerable<char>. –  Tymek Sep 19 '12 at 7:42
    
@Tymek indeed - I do quite a lot of library work that handles primitive, inbuilt types and collections - and it is virtually always necessary to pull out scenarios such as string before applying generalizations, for exactly those reasons. –  Marc Gravell Sep 19 '12 at 8:40
    
if the type is ICollection<T>, which implements IEnumerable<T>, the if statement doesn't evaluate to true. Is there a way to tell that it is IEnumerable<T> or any of its subclasses? –  Thiago Silva Jun 24 '14 at 17:18

i is of type NS.1.Program+<GetInts>d__0, which is a subtype of IEnumerable<int>. Thus, you can use either

if (i is IEnumerable<int>) { ... }

or IsAssignableFrom (like in Marc's answer).

share|improve this answer

Same technique as Marc's answer, but Linqier:

namespace NS
{
    class Program
    {
        static IEnumerable<int> GetInts()
        {
            yield return 1;
        }

        static void Main()
        {
            var i = GetInts();
            var type = i.GetType();
            var isEnumerableOfT = type.GetInterfaces()
                .Any(ti => ti.IsGenericType
                     && ti.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(IEnumerable<>));
            Console.WriteLine(isEnumerableOfT);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

How to determine if object is of type IEnumerable <T>?

Please feel free to use this fine, ultra small, generic extension method to determine if any object implements IEnumerable interface. It extends the Object type, so you can execute it using any instance of any object you're using.

public static class CollectionTestClass
{
    public static Boolean IsEnumerable<T>(this Object testedObject)
    {
        return (testedObject is IEnumerable<T>);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You can use the is keyword.

[TestFixture]
class Program
{
    static IEnumerable<int> GetInts()
    {
        yield return 1;
    }

    [Test]
    static void Maasd()
    {
        var i = GetInts();
        Assert.IsTrue(i is IEnumerable<int>);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

How to detect if type is another generic type should help you out with this.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.