Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I got stuck with regexp to validate only numbers from 1-10 that could have two dashes(hyphens) before, for example:

--9

or

--10

or

--1

but not

--11 or not --0

I tried like seems to me everything, example:

/(-\-\[1-10])/

What is wrong?

EDIT 1:

Thanks a lot for so many working examples!!

What if I also wanted to validate to numbers before all of this, example:

8--10 but not 0--10 or not 11--11

I tried this but it didn't work:

/--([1-9]|10:[1-9]|10)\b/

EDIT 2:

Oh, this one works, finally:

/^(10|[1-9])--(10|[1-9])$/
share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Have a try with:

/\b(?:[1-9]|10)--(?:[1-9]|10)\b/

Change according to OP's edit.

Explanation:

The regular expression:

(?-imsx:\b(?:[1-9]|10)--(?:[1-9]|10)\b)

matches as follows:

NODE                     EXPLANATION
----------------------------------------------------------------------
(?-imsx:                 group, but do not capture (case-sensitive)
                         (with ^ and $ matching normally) (with . not
                         matching \n) (matching whitespace and #
                         normally):
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  \b                       the boundary between a word char (\w) and
                           something that is not a word char
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  (?:                      group, but do not capture:
----------------------------------------------------------------------
    [1-9]                    any character of: '1' to '9'
----------------------------------------------------------------------
   |                        OR
----------------------------------------------------------------------
    10                       '10'
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  )                        end of grouping
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  --                       '--'
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  (?:                      group, but do not capture:
----------------------------------------------------------------------
    [1-9]                    any character of: '1' to '9'
----------------------------------------------------------------------
   |                        OR
----------------------------------------------------------------------
    10                       '10'
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  )                        end of grouping
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  \b                       the boundary between a word char (\w) and
                           something that is not a word char
----------------------------------------------------------------------
)                        end of grouping
----------------------------------------------------------------------
share|improve this answer
    
This would match ---10 as well. –  Ravi Thapliyal Aug 27 '13 at 13:46
    
Thank you everybody but I can only accept one answer unfortunately and M42 provided fastest second edit! –  Ilia Rostovtsev Aug 27 '13 at 13:52
1  
@IliaRostovtsev: I've edited to match also 10--10 –  M42 Aug 27 '13 at 13:58
    
That would be great for the future readers (including myself) if you provided detailed explanation but if you're not I probably will when have more time! Thanks!! –  Ilia Rostovtsev Aug 27 '13 at 14:07
    
Wonderful! Thanks again!! –  Ilia Rostovtsev Aug 27 '13 at 14:41

I guess this will fit

/\-\-([1-9]|10)\b/

if you don't want to capture your number, add ?: :

/\-\-(?:[1-9]|10)\b/
share|improve this answer
1  
No need to escape hyphens -. –  Ravi Thapliyal Aug 27 '13 at 13:42
    
You're right. I'm doing that just because habit (with escape it will works well either in group or inline, so it's universal way to use it) –  Alma Do Aug 27 '13 at 13:48

The correct regex is

/\b--([1-9]|10)\b/

You're incorrectly escaping the first [ of your character class as \[. The character class used is incorrect as well. It would be treated as a character class with members 1 to 1 and a 0 i.e. [10] which means it matches either 0 or 1.

Also, the hyphens - don't need to be escaped outside a character class []. To validate the numbers that come before the hyphens as well use

/\b([1-9]|10)--([1-9]|10)\b/
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for explanations! –  Ilia Rostovtsev Aug 27 '13 at 14:17

Outside a character class, you don't need to escape hyphens. Also, your character class [1-10] will only match 1 and 0, because [1-10] is equal to [10] and that will only match 1 and 0. Try this regex:

/^--(10|[1-9])$/
share|improve this answer
    
This would match ---10 as well. –  Ravi Thapliyal Aug 27 '13 at 13:45
    
@Ravi: I added a caret sign. Now it won't longer match ---10 –  ProgramFOX Aug 27 '13 at 13:46

When you write [1-10], it mean characters 1 to 1 + the 0 character. It as if you had write [0-1].

In fact, in your case, it would be better to test cases --1 to --9 and case --10 separately with something like : /^(--10)|(--[1-9])$/

You can test your regex on http://myregexp.com/

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.