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I have a yaml file which contains entries in a similar form to this. The entries represent change sets for a database and the key is the database name. The duplicates are needed since there may be multiple changes to a database which happen in a particular order.

exampleName:
  user: user
  version: 1
  artifact: example1
  order: 1
exampleName:
  user: user
  version: 1
  artifact: example2
  order: 4
aName:
  user: user2
  version: 12
  artifact: example3
  order: 3

I would like to be able to distinguish them by name and artifact such that both instances of exampleName would be recognised. However when I use YAML::load_file since they have the same key only the last one will be kept in the hash and the other one lost. Is there someway to have the key be a combination of the name and artifact when loading the yaml into a hash or do I need to manually parse the yaml. I have found one question vaguely related.

In Ruby, how to be warned of duplicate keys in hashes when loading a YAML document?

It seems like it might not be possible the way I would like it, but any work around would be great.

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1  
If it's a normal hash then values with the same keys overwrite each other. Do you not want to use a normal hash? –  Dave Newton Aug 27 '13 at 13:57
    
The problem is this is more of a bug fix in a larger structure of other processes so not using a normal hash might cause a lot of re-factoring, I'm open to suggestions of some other way of doing it though. I'm primarily a java programmer and not very competent in ruby so I don't really know how I could do it. –  dannyhw Aug 27 '13 at 14:09
1  
The Yaml spec says “It is an error for two equal keys to appear in the same mapping node.” So what you have isn’t valid Yaml. It goes on to say “In such a case the YAML processor may continue, ignoring the second key: value pair and issuing an appropriate warning.” which isn’t what the current Ruby Yaml parser does, so arguably the current behaviour is a bug. –  matt Aug 27 '13 at 14:17
    
Thanks for your replies. You're right it seems that to do what I want I would need to restructure the yaml so the id is some other unique id since the yaml is invalid otherwise. –  dannyhw Aug 27 '13 at 14:24
    
But that's how a normal hash works, it's no different than a Java map. You don't really have a YAML file in the traditional sense: you have a collection of records, within which order is important. It's a log file. –  Dave Newton Aug 27 '13 at 14:25

2 Answers 2

If you are able to alter how the Yaml file is generated, or if you are able to preprocess it appropriately, you could create a file containing several Yaml documents. It would look something like this:

exampleName:
  user: user
  version: 1
  artifact: example1
  order: 1
---
exampleName:
  user: user
  version: 1
  artifact: example2
  order: 4
---
aName:
  user: user2
  version: 12
  artifact: example3
  order: 3

Note how each document is separated from the others with ---.

You can now parse this using YAML.load_stream, which will give you an array of hashes:

YAML.load_stream File.read('./your_yaml_file.yaml')

The result will be:

[{"exampleName"=>
   {"user"=>"user", "version"=>1, "artifact"=>"example1", "order"=>1}},
 {"exampleName"=>
   {"user"=>"user", "version"=>1, "artifact"=>"example2", "order"=>4}},
 {"aName"=>
   {"user"=>"user2", "version"=>12, "artifact"=>"example3", "order"=>3}}]
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Ok thanks I will see if I can edit the yaml and experiment with this. –  dannyhw Aug 27 '13 at 14:32

There is Psych parser/AST-builder behind YAML::load.

If I was forced to use the “putrid” YAML as you do, I would take a look at Psych::TreeBuilder class. I would subclass it and re-implement scalar method. I never did so, but it looks like the right way. Since you were asked for any suggestion, here it is.

Hope it helps.

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That seem like a definite option I will look into it. Thanks for your reply. –  dannyhw Aug 27 '13 at 15:00

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