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I am converting a VB.Net application to C# (as well as learning C#) and I ran into a problem. One of the functions takes in an object and applies modifications to certain parameters based on what is passed. This way, one function can be used to update any control passed to it, which is working fine in VB.

The full function has a lot more logic behind it, but here is a scaled back version showing the basics:

public void TransformObject(object objObject, int LeftPadding, int TopPadding, int WidthChange, int HeightChange)
{        
    objObject.Top = TopPadding;
    objObject.Left = LeftPadding;
    objObject.Width = WidthChange;
    objObject.Height = HeightChange;
}

The problem is that 'Top', 'Left', 'Width', 'Height', etc. are not defined, since it is using the object type.

Is there a way to keep the existing structure without having to create a separate function or definition for each possible control type?

EDIT: I am using the .Net 3.5 framework.

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You can cast objObject to Control –  I4V Aug 27 '13 at 14:33

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use dynamic:

public void TransformObject(object objObject, int LeftPadding, int TopPadding, int WidthChange, int HeightChange)
{        
    dynamic dynObject = (dynamic)objObject;
    dynObject.Top = TopPadding;
    dynObject.Left = LeftPadding;
    dynObject.Width = WidthChange;
    dynObject.Height = HeightChange;
}

Or find an interface/base class (possibly Control?) that all these types have in common and use it in method signature, instead of object.

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I forgot to mention I am using .Net 3.5 and I don't think 'dynamic' is available in it. Are there any other options? –  Nicholas Post Aug 27 '13 at 14:59
    
I changed the function to take in Control instead of object. This fixed the issue. Thanks! –  Nicholas Post Aug 27 '13 at 15:59

Use a base class, like MyBaseClass that has definitions for Top, Left, Width, and Height

public class MyBaseClass
{
    public int Top {get; set;}
    public int Left{get; set;}
    public int Width {get; set;}
    public int Height {get; set;}

}

and every class that you want to pass in, should derive from that base class

public class MyDerivedClass : MyBaseClass
{
}
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You will need to determine if the objects passed to the function implement the same interface or inherit from the same base class that exposes those properties. If they do then simply change the interface of the function so you accept the common interface/base class type as the parameter rather than object. If not then you are left with nasty choices.

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One of the solutions here is the use of interfaces. For example if I understand your question right you could try this:

public interface IMyInterface
    {
        int Top { get; set;}
        int Left { get; set; }
        int Width { get; set; }
        int Height { get; set; }
    }

public void TransformObject(object objObject, int LeftPadding, int TopPadding, int WidthChange, int HeightChange)
        {
            if (objObject is IMyInterface)
            {
                ((IMyInterface)objObject).Top = TopPadding;
                ((IMyInterface)objObject).Left = LeftPadding;
                ((IMyInterface)objObject).Width = WidthChange;
                ((IMyInterface)objObject).Height = HeightChange;
            }
        }

Code is not optimized but this should do the trick :)

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I would venture a guess that the object being passed is in fact a Control (assuming this is a WinForms application). You could change the method signature to specify this and see if that is in fact the case, or you could cast the object to a Control and test thoroughly (and/or add logging if the cast fails:

Changing the signature:

public void TransformObject(System.Windows.Forms.Control objObject, int LeftPadding, int TopPadding, int WidthChange, int HeightChange)
{        
    objObject.Top = TopPadding;
    objObject.Left = LeftPadding;
    objObject.Width = WidthChange;
    objObject.Height = HeightChange;
}

Downcasting internally:

public void TransformObject(object objObject, int LeftPadding, int TopPadding, int WidthChange, int HeightChange)
{        
    var control = objObject as System.Windows.Forms.Control;
    if (control != null)
    {
        control.Top = TopPadding;
        control.Left = LeftPadding;
        control.Width = WidthChange;
        control.Height = HeightChange;
    }
    else 
    {
      // Turns out it isn't a control, throw an exception or Log it
    }  
}
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Don't you define the new instance of the object before calling the method.

object obj = new object()

TransformObject(obj,5,5,5,5)

public void TransformObject(object objObject, int LeftPadding, int TopPadding, int WidthChange, int HeightChange)
{        
    objObject.Top = TopPadding;
    objObject.Left = LeftPadding;
    objObject.Width = WidthChange;
    objObject.Height = HeightChange;
}
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