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I just wrote an array keys to only return the exact keys that exists in the form $_POST

function array_key_exists_exact($strkeys, $search) 
{
    $keys = split('\|',$strkeys);
    foreach($keys as $key)
    {
      if(array_key_exists($key,$search))
      {
          $newkeys[$key]=$key;
          unset($newkeys[$key]);
      }
      else
      {     
      }
    }
    return $newkeys;
}

however it is returning all the keys, what am i doing wrong.

eg:

$str="email|phone|address|school|country";
array_key_exists_exact($str, $_POST) 

should only return whats contained in the form based on the $str.

so if my form has:

<form>
<input type=text name=email>
<input type=text name=phone>
<input type=text name=address>
</form>

out put should be:

array("email", "phone", "address")

right now it outputs this: array("email", "phone", "address", "school", "country").

and yes, i must pass $str="email|phone|address|school|country";

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1  
I'm surprised this outputs anything at all, given that you're unsetting the entry in $newkeys right after you create them. –  deceze Aug 27 '13 at 15:05
    
it actually outputs:) i thought i should unset it when i find a key. thanks –  Menew Aug 27 '13 at 15:06
    
What is the point of doing $newkeys[$key] and then immediately unsetting it again? Might as well just eliminate the entire foreach loop. –  Marc B Aug 27 '13 at 15:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I don't know what's wrong with your function, split() is deprecated for a start so I thought I'd write a new one, here it is:

$str="email|phone|phone|school|country";


$_POST['email'] = 'test2';
$_POST['school'] = 'test1'; 


function return_array_keys($strkeys,$search) {
    $strings = explode('|',$strkeys);
    foreach($strings as $key) {
        if(array_key_exists(trim($key),$search)) {
            $newkeys[$key] = $search[$key]; 
        }else {
            continue;   
        }
    }
    return $newkeys;
}

$test = return_array_keys($str, $_POST);

var_dump($test);
share|improve this answer

Are you looking for array_intersect?

$possible = array('email', 'phone', ...);
$existing = array_intersect($possible, array_keys($_POST));
var_dump($existing);
share|improve this answer
    
let me try your response.. –  Menew Aug 27 '13 at 15:06
    
it is showing all the $possible keys...hmm. –  Menew Aug 27 '13 at 15:10
    
It most certainly does not: 3v4l.org/DCOKS –  deceze Aug 27 '13 at 15:12
    
so i output $possible, then i output $array_keys($_POST) and its like this array([0]=>email,[1]=>phone) does intersect uses the key or the value? –  Menew Aug 27 '13 at 15:14
    
array_intersect uses the values. –  deceze Aug 27 '13 at 15:16

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