Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I wrote a ring detection program in a very stupid way. Can anyone help to improve it? The following code is to find all 5-member rings. I need a general function which is able to find N-member rings, where N is typically less than 10. Thanks a million!

In my problem, I have about 2000 points. Each point connected to several other points, these connected points are stored in neighbor_list. And the point[i].neighbor_list() return a list of the neighbors of point[i]. The idea in the following code is starting from one point, traverse its neighbor list and it's neighbor's neighbor list, and so on, to find the routes/cycles/rings to go back to the original point. The central part of my code is the following, which finds only rings formed by 5 points. I need a general code to find all N-member rings. Please leave a comment if anything is not clear.

for r0 in range(2000): #ring member 0
    rin.append(r0)
    for r1 in point[r0].neighbor_list():
        rin.append(r1) #ring member 1 
        for r2 in point[r1].neighbor_list():
            if r2 == r0: continue # to avoid the case of a-b-a ...
            else: rin.append(r2)
            for r3 in point[r2].neighbor_list():
                if r3 == r1: continue
                else: rin.append(r3)
                for r4 in point[r3].neighbor_list():
                    if r4 == r2: continue
                    else: rin.append(r4)
                    for r5 in point[r4].neighbor_list():
                        if r5 == r0: 
                            rin.append(r5)
                            rings.append(list(rin)) # find a ring, save it
                            rin.pop()
                        else: continue  
                    rin.pop()
                rin.pop()
            rin.pop()
        rin.pop()
    rin.pop()
share|improve this question
1  
What do you mean by 'ring'? –  That1Guy Aug 27 '13 at 15:05
    
And what are these objects such that neighbor_list() works? (and what does it return despite the obvious!) –  Jon Clements Aug 27 '13 at 15:07
    
to That1Guy and Jon Clements: Thanks for the response. I am sorry for the confusing message. Each point connected to several points, these connected points are stored in its neighbor_list. And the point[i].neighbor_list() return a list of these neighbors. So the idea is starting from one point, traverse its neighbor list and it's neighbor's neighbor list, see if there is a route go back to the original point. The route is defined as a ring. Let me know if it is still not clear. –  Greg Aug 27 '13 at 16:00
    
@That1Guy: Thanks for the response. Please see above my explanation. –  Greg Aug 27 '13 at 16:10
    
@Jon Clements: Thanks for the response. Please see above my explanation –  Greg Aug 27 '13 at 16:10

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You are trying to find cycles of size N in an undirected graph.

You may find all cycles and then select the ones with right size. See this answer. Finding all cycles in undirected graphs

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. I need some time to learn the "breadth first search" to see if it works for me. –  Greg Aug 27 '13 at 16:18
    
The first link I put was not correct, it was for detecting one cycle. I quickly edited it to "all cycles" but not quickly enough. You are lucky, there is even an answer python code with this question. (I didn't test it) –  MatthieuW Aug 27 '13 at 18:03
    
Thanks again. The python code in the link doesn't seem work for my problem. I have 2000 points and about 8000 edges, which might make it impossible to find all cycles. I tried to give a break, "if len(path) > 10: break", to the loop "for edge in graph:", that did not seem to help either. I never find any cycle by that code, while my code above take 1 second to find all 5-points cycles. –  Greg Aug 27 '13 at 20:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.