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I'm using a dictionary to accumulate the number of occurrences of keys and, consequently, the core operation is writing a key-value pair where the value is the previous value plus one or just one if there was no previous value. However, this requires two separate dictionary operations (read and write) when I could just be doing one (AddOrUpdate).

I notice that the concurrent dictionary supports AddOrUpdate but the ordinary generic Dictionary does not appear to.

Consequently, a dictionary of references to mutable ints is faster. However, this introduces unnecessary references which means heap allocations and write barriers. So I'm guessing it is possible to do significantly better but I cannot see how without rewriting Dictionary from scratch. Am I right?

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So you're trying to eliminate one of the lookups in an add or update scenario? –  mydogisbox Aug 27 '13 at 16:40
    
Concurrent dictionary seems quite performant in many cases, have you checked if it provides sufficient performance for your scenario? –  Alex Aug 27 '13 at 16:48
    
can you sort the key-values? I guess most will be O(n log n) so you might have to test for best performance –  Carsten König Aug 27 '13 at 16:56
1  
Maybe you could try to use a array with element counts and key/index-into-array dictionary - this will need a dictionary lookup and a array indexing - might be a bit faster in extreme cases –  Carsten König Aug 27 '13 at 17:19
1  
Sounds like you are right, you can do way better. One practical alternative to writing from scratch is starting from say the Mono implementation: github.com/mono/mono/blob/master/mcs/class/corlib/… –  t0yv0 Aug 27 '13 at 17:49

3 Answers 3

You can do something like this:

private class Counter
{
  public string Key       { get ; set ; }
  public int    Frequency { get ; set ; }
}

...

Dictionary<string,Counter> frequencyTable = new Dictionary<string,Counter>() ;

...

string someKey = GetKeyToLookup() ;
Counter item = null ;
bool hit = frequencyTable.TryGetValue( someKey,out item ) ;
if ( !hit )
{
  item = new Counter{ Key=someKey,Frequency=0 } ;
}
++ item.Frequency ;

If that's not good enough, why write your own? Use the the high performance C5 Collections Library. It's free (originally funded by Microsoft, in fact), builds on Microsoft's System.Collections.Generic interfaces and whose dictionaries, sets and bags support FindOrAdd() semantics.

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Yes, that's exactly what I meant by "a dictionary of references to mutable ints is faster" but that introduces unnecessary references which means heap allocations and write barriers. –  Jon Harrop Aug 29 '13 at 1:33
    
@JonHarrop Did you try it? Is C5 actually more efficient for this task? Is the second lookup or the reference type more costly? –  Goswin Mar 7 '14 at 16:14
    
I tried it with my own code (not C5) and the dictionary of mutable references was faster that double lookups on a dictionary of values. The second lookup is more expensive. However, a dictionary that allows add-in-place would be the fastest solution, of course. –  Jon Harrop Mar 10 '14 at 23:05

As Jim Mischel mentioned - it's impossible to do single lookup for changing dictionary's item value. ConcurrentDictionary.AddOrUpdate method do more than one lookup operation (reflected sources):

public TValue AddOrUpdate(TKey key, TValue addValue, Func<TKey, TValue, TValue> updateValueFactory)
{
    TValue local2;
    if (key == null)
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("key");
    }
    if (updateValueFactory == null)
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("updateValueFactory");
    }
    do
    {
        TValue local3;
        while (this.TryGetValue(key, out local3))
        {
            TValue newValue = updateValueFactory(key, local3);
            if (this.TryUpdate(key, newValue, local3))
            {
                return newValue;
            }
        }
    }
    while (!this.TryAddInternal(key, addValue, false, true, out local2));
    return local2;
}

I've made performance test with concurrent dictionary and simple ditcionary:

AddOrUpdate extension for IDictionary:

public static class DictionaryExtensions
{
    public static void AddOrUpdate<TKey, TValue>(this IDictionary<TKey, TValue> dict, TKey key, TValue initValue, Func<TKey, TValue, TValue> updateFunc)
    {
        TValue value;
        value = dict.TryGetValue(key, out value) ? updateFunc(key, value) : initValue;

        dict[key] = value;
    }
}

Test:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    const int dictLength = 100000;
    const int testCount = 1000000;

    var cdict = new ConcurrentDictionary<string, int>(GetRandomData(dictLength));
    var dict = GetRandomData(dictLength).ToDictionary(x => x.Key, x => x.Value);

    var stopwatch = new Stopwatch();
    stopwatch.Start();
    foreach (var pair in GetRandomData(testCount))
        cdict.AddOrUpdate(pair.Key, 1, (x, y) => y+1);          

    stopwatch.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("Concurrent dictionary: {0}", stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds);

    stopwatch.Reset();
    stopwatch.Start();

    foreach (var pair in GetRandomData(testCount))
        dict.AddOrUpdate(pair.Key, 1, (x, y) => y+1);   

    stopwatch.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("Dictionary: {0}", stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds);
    Console.ReadLine();
}

static IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<string, int>> GetRandomData(int count)
{
    const int constSeed = 100;
    var randGenerator = new Random(constSeed);
    return Enumerable.Range(0, count).Select((x, ind) => new KeyValuePair<string, int>(randGenerator.Next().ToString() + "_" + ind, randGenerator.Next()));
}

Test results on my environment (ms):

ConcurrentDictionary: 2504
Dictionary: 1351
share|improve this answer

A dictionary update does not require multiple lookups if you're using reference types:

Say you have a Dictionary<string, Foo>, where Foo is a reference type and includes a Count property:

void UpdateCount(string key)
{
    Foo f;
    if (dict.TryGetValue(key, out f))
    {
        // do the update
        ++f.Count;
    }
    else
    {
        dict[key] = 1;
    }
}

If your values are value types ... well, then you have to deal with value type semantics. And that includes having to do two lookups.

That said, dictionary lookup is pretty dang fast. If this is causing you an issue, you must have a whole lot of occurrences to count.

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