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Ok so, this is quite confusing to explain. I will try my best.

Inspired by the Bukkit Event System where you can make voids an event handler by just using @EventHandler.

Example:

@EventHandler
public void aRandomName(PlayerMoveEvent ev) {

}

As you can see, the name of the method doesn't matter. Which event is passed on is determined by the event argument type.

All events extend the Event class. I have made up some code which I think would work, except for one thing.

public List<Object> eventContainers;

public void fireEvent(Event e) {

    Method[] methods;

    for (Object o : eventContainers) {
        Object[] classes = o.getClass().getClasses();

        for (Object clss : classes) {
            methods = clss.getClass().getMethods();
            for (Method m : methods) {
                if (m.getAnnotation(EventHandler.class) != null) {
                    try {
                        Class[] requiredTypes = m.getParameterTypes();
                        for(Class cl : requiredTypes) {
                            if(e.equals(cl)) {
                                m.invoke(clss, e);
                            }
                        }

                    } catch (IllegalAccessException ex) {
                    } catch (IllegalArgumentException ex) {
                    } catch (InvocationTargetException ex) {
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

What my code does: Loops through all the classes in eventContainers, looks for methods that have the @EventHandler annotation and sends the specified event to that method. However, I want to see what kind of event the given event in fireEvent(Event e) is, and then look at the methods who require an event parameter of that kind. How would I do that? I figure that

Class[] requiredTypes = m.getParameterTypes();
for(Class cl : requiredTypes) {
  if(e.equals(cl)) {
    m.invoke(clss, e);
  }
}

will not work.

Ultimately I want to be able to pass on events to plugins. Like this:

EventManager.fireEvent(new PlayerMoveEvent(player));

Which will be sent to all plugins and the plugins that have

@EventHandler
public void aVoid(PlayerMoveEvent e) {
//stuff
}

If you have any questions, I will try to explain it better. Thanks in advance for your help!

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4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your code uses e.equals(cl), which is comparing an instance of Event with an instance of Class (the class of an instance of Event) - this will never return true. What you want to do instead is:

if(e.getClass().equals(cl)) {
    m.invoke(clss, e);
}

Alternatively, if you want methods annotated with @EventHandler to handle all subclasses of the class that their method signature defines (i.e. a method like handle(Event e) would be called with PlayerMoveEvents as well as all other events), then you want:

if(cl.isAssignableFrom(e.getClass())) {
    m.invoke(clss, e);
}

See the Class Javadoc here for more information.

Note that I think there are a few other problems in you code. For example, Method.invoke should be called with an instance of the class that contains a method that is annotated with @EventHandler. It is a little unclear from your code, but I believe this should therefore be:

m.invoke(o, e);

Also, by calling o.getClass().getClasses(), you are iterating over the classes defined in the class of o - you probably want to iterate over the methods of the class of o directly, i.e.:

for (Method m : o.getClass().getMethods()) {
    if (m.getAnnotation(EventHandler.class) != null) {
        Class[] requiredTypes = m.getParameterTypes();
        if (requiredTypes.length == 1 && requiredTypes[0].isAssignableFrom(e.getClass()) {
            m.invoke(o, e);
        }
    }
}
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You can get the parameter types from a Method using method.getGenericParameterTypes(), so:

m.invoke(clss, m.getGenericParameterTypes()[0].class.cast(e));

Not sure if that's what you want.

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By looking at that piece of code, it seems like you try to cast the event e to the parameter required in the method. If it cannot be done then it will not be sent? (as in exception catching) I think this is what I'm looking for. Thanks alot! –  Limnic Aug 27 '13 at 17:32
    
That is what I do, cast the event to the parameter required. You can use normal try/catch blocks for exception handling. See InvocationTargetException, IllegalAccessException, ClassCastException. –  zyngawow Aug 27 '13 at 17:36
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Assuming the EventHandler annotated method only has one parameter

Method[] methods = YourClass.class.getDeclaredMethods();
Object yourInstance = null; // get it
Event e = null; // get it
for (Method method : methods) {
    EventHandler handler = method.getAnnotation(EventHandler.class);
    if (handler != null) {
        Class<?>[] parameterTypes = method.getParameterTypes();
        // you're going to need different logic if you have more than one parameter
        if (parameterTypes.length == 1 && parameterTypes[0].isAssignableFrom(e.getClass())) {
            method.invoke(yourInstance, e);
        }
    }
}

I've not included any exception handling.

Get all the methods of event handler candidate classes and iterate over them. If a method has the @EventHandler annotation, get its parameter type list. If it only has one parameter and that type is assignable from your event type e.getClass(), then invoke it passing in your event.

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I have now modified the code to a working event system!!!!!! :D thanks so much andersschuller!

public void fireEvent(Event e) {

    Method[] methods;

    for (Object o : eventContainers) {
        methods = o.getClass().getMethods();
        for (Method m : methods) {
            if (m.getAnnotation(EventHandler.class) != null) {
                try {

                    if (m.getParameterTypes()[0].isAssignableFrom(e.getClass())) {
                        m.invoke(o, e);
                    }
                } catch (IllegalAccessException ex) {
                } catch (IllegalArgumentException ex) {
                } catch (InvocationTargetException ex) {
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

I kept all answers in mind, thanks all!

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