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In the following two versions of switch case, I am wondering which version is efficient.

1:

string* convertToString(int i)
{
    switch(i)
    {
    case 1:
        return new string("one");
    case 2:
        return new string("two");
    case 3:
        return new string("three");
        .
        .
    default:
        return new string("error");
    }
}

2:

string* convertToString(int i)
{
    string *intAsString;
    switch(i)
    {
    case 1:
        intAsString = new string("one");
        break;
    case 2:
        intAsString = new string("two");
        break;
    case 3:
        intAsString = new string("three");
        break;
        .
        .
    default:
        intAsString = new string("error");
        break;
    }
return intAsString;
}

1: has multiple return statements will it cause compiler to generate extra code?

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3  
Remark : I've noticed that your functions both return a (string*) new string() - is that really nessecary ? –  Maciek Dec 4 '09 at 14:19
2  
I would be interested to know how that code is used. It just doesn't feel right to me. –  James Brooks Dec 4 '09 at 14:20
1  
Problem is that string can't be 'callable' with brackets, and also be a valid type for the pointer declaration. Closest I can get is to ignore the declarations and just make new string(blah); valid. For instance #define new "The answer is: " and #define string(ARG) #ARG ;-) –  Steve Jessop Dec 4 '09 at 15:26
2  
codepad.org/XcrIuGRJ –  pmg Dec 4 '09 at 15:39
2  
Excellent. To think that I've programmed C all these years, and never realised you can use function-style macro names without the arguments, and they'll be left untouched ;-) –  Steve Jessop Dec 4 '09 at 15:51

15 Answers 15

up vote 27 down vote accepted

This is a premature optimization worry.

The former form is clearer and has fewer source lines, that is a compelling reason to chose it (in my opinion), of course.

You should (as usual) profile your program to determine if this function is even on the "hot list" for optimization. This will tell you if there is a performance penalty for using break.

As was pointed out in the comments, it's very possible that the main performance culprit of this code is the dynamically allocated strings. Generally, when implementing this kind of "integer to string" mapping function, you should return string constants.

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3  
Wanting to understand your code is hardly premature optimization. Wanting to understand what happens in a switch statement is perfectly sensible. Of course, a meaningful answer should explain why the performance difference is nonexistent. But it shouldn't say "Pretend that performance doesn't matter, and ignore what the compiler does to your code" –  jalf Dec 4 '09 at 14:47
    
+1, And if you are to "optimize it" already - change the return value from string* to const char* first and then worry about this minor switch issue ;) –  RnR Dec 4 '09 at 14:48
1  
@jalf - the compiler can do whatever it wants with both versions and generate exactly the same code, and if the function get's inlined while called with a constant parameter the switch statement may be completely removed. And he has a much bigger performance issue with the strings in this function - that's why it's premature optimization looking at the way of returning the pointer... –  RnR Dec 4 '09 at 14:51
1  
Neither voting up nor down. I really don't like those copy-and-paste premature-optimization answers. While the answer is of course correct, it isn't an answer to the original question. And instead of some blah blah about profiling, which wasn't exactly what the OP asked, some hints why it is premature optimization would be more helpful. –  hirschhornsalz Dec 4 '09 at 15:47

Both are.

What you should really be concerned about is your use of pointers here. Is it necessary? Who will delete these strings? Isn't there a simpler alternative?

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There should be no difference in the compiled code. However:

  1. You'll probably find returning the strings by value to be more efficient.
  2. If there are a lot of strings consider prepopulating a vector with them (or declare a static array) and use i as the index in.
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2  
@Vainstah - why is (1) inaccurate and evil? –  philsquared Dec 4 '09 at 14:25
    
1 = inacurate and evil. 2=correct in some cases, perhaps as a global symbol table for numeric literals to strings. –  Hassan Syed Dec 4 '09 at 14:26
5  
@Vainstah RVO will likely optimise the copy away and construct directly at the call site. Even if not, std::string has been crafted as a value type and typically manages its internal memory such that small strings are held in a static array and long strings on the heap. By creating the strings themselves on the heap you're throwing all that optimisation away, but still paying for its overhead. –  philsquared Dec 4 '09 at 14:31
1  
what does garbage collection have to do with this? –  philsquared Dec 4 '09 at 14:40
1  
@Steve, agreed - that would remove any uncertainty about whether RVO kicks in, but I'd still argue that it's more natural and idiomatic to return the strings by value, leaving the optimising for later if necessary. If RVO does apply it should boil down to much the same code. –  philsquared Dec 4 '09 at 15:00

A switch statement is basically a series of if statements as generated machine instructions. One simple optimization strategy is to place the most frequent case first in the switch statement.

I also recommend the same solution as Sebastian but without the assert.

static const char *numberAsString[] = {
    "Zero",
    "One",
    "Two",
    "Three",
    "Four",
    "Five",
    "Six",
};

const char *ConvertToString(int num) {
  if (num < 1 || num >= (sizeof(numberAsString)/sizeof(char*))) 
    return "error";
  return numberAsString[num];
}
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Do you have any thing backing this up: "A switch statement is basically a series of if statements as generated machine instruction". I'd call it downright incorrect. –  Fredrik Dec 4 '09 at 14:54
    
as this is c++ this is the best answer imo. –  Hassan Syed Dec 4 '09 at 15:04
    
@Vainstah: Out of curiosity, is that because it doesn't use any C++ at all (not saying it is a bad thing) or because of the incorrect statement about a switch/case resulting in a lot of if statements being generated in the order they appear? –  Fredrik Dec 4 '09 at 15:08
    
Bad code. The error appears like a valid return. It should at least return NULL in case of an error (to separate the valid from the invalid cases) or throw an exception. Regarding the "series of if statements": Compilers can transform a switch-case into almost anything. They may even tumble the cases if they think it's useful for code generation. Relying on old-school source-to-binary rules is magical (and often wishful) thinking. –  Thorsten79 Dec 4 '09 at 15:13
3  
BTW, series of if statements can be converted to a jumptable too by a smart compiler. –  hirschhornsalz Dec 4 '09 at 15:46

You can never know how optimization will influence the code produced unless you compile with a specific compiler version, a specific set of settings and a specific code base.

C++ optimizing compilers may decide to turn your source code upside down to gain a specific optimization only available for compiler architecture so-and-so without you ever knowing it. A powerful optimizing compiler may e.g. find out that only 2 out of 10 cases are ever needed and will optimize away the whole switch-case-statement.

So my answer to your question is: Mu.

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1  
yes, you should not worry about such things as a application developer. At least till you get enough feeling for it. Even if there was something to optimize here it would not make any measurable difference to your application :D unless you wrote a 3d engine which represented matrices and vectors as strings. if you ever find a real hotspot in your code then come back to us with the code. –  Hassan Syed Dec 4 '09 at 14:24

If you turn optimizing on, both functions will very likely generate equivalent code.

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The compiler most probably will optimize both versions to the same code.

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3  
"Have faith my son" ;-) –  jldupont Dec 4 '09 at 14:19
1  
Have faith? Disassemble and you will know ;) –  int3 Dec 4 '09 at 18:18

They will almost certainly both be compiled to an identical, highly-efficient branch table. Use whichever one you feel is clearer.

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I would suggest something of the form:

void CScope::ToStr( int i, std::string& strOutput )
{
   switch( i )
   {
   case 1:
        strOutput = "Some text involving the number 1";

   ... etc etc
}

By returning a pointer to a string created on the heap, you risk memory leaks. Specifically regarding your question, I would suggest that the least number of return paths is more advisable than premature optimisation.

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Consider keeping the strings as static constants:

static char const g_aaczNUMBER[][] = 
    {
        {"Zero"}, { "One" }, ...
    };

static char const g_aczERROR[] = { "Error" };

char* convertIntToString(int i) const { 
    return i<0 || 9<i ? g_aczERROR : g_aaczNUMBER[i]; 
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why trade off clarity for an obfuscated and actually rather error prone (should you ever extend it or get an argument >9 when not asserting) solution not even using C++ strings? –  Fredrik Dec 4 '09 at 14:49
    
I consider my solution to be much clearer than a huge switch statement. I omitted the error case more out of lazyness. –  Sebastian Dec 4 '09 at 14:55
    
Additionally, using global constants eliminates all string copying. –  Sebastian Dec 4 '09 at 14:56
    
@Sebastian: I disagree about the clarity but what if you need to cover -1 to 5 or 100, 200, 300, 301, 302, 304, 401 and 501? Still clearer for you? –  Fredrik Dec 4 '09 at 15:02
    
You only run into problems if the numbers are not continuous. If you have 500 continuous numbers i'd still write them in an array and be done with a single line of code. –  Sebastian Dec 4 '09 at 15:11

You optimise[*] switch statements by doing as little work as possible in the switch (because it's uncertain whether the compiler will common up the duplication). If you insist on returning a string by pointer, and using a switch statement, I'd write this:

string *convertToString(int i) {
    const char *str;
    switch(i) {
        case 1 : str = "one"; break;
        // etc
        default : str = "error"; break;
    }
    return new string(str);
}

But of course for this example I'd probably just use a lookup table:

const char *values[] = {"error", "one", ... };

string convertToString(unsigned int i) {
    if (i >= sizeof(values)/sizeof(*values)) i = 0;
    return values[i];
}

That said, I just answered a question about the static initialization order fiasco, so you don't in general want rules of thumb which demand globals. What you do has to depend on the context of the function.

[*] Where I mean the kind of rule-of-thumb optimisation that you do when writing portable code, or in your first version, in the hope of creating code that is clear to read and won't need too much real optimisation. Real optimisation involves real measurements.

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There won't be any difference in efficiency here. Certainly none that will matter. The only benefit of going with option #2 is if you'll need to do some post-processing of the string that applies to all cases.

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Have you tried compiling them and comparing file sizes?

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1  
..or analyzing the machine code and/or assembly of code you wrote to analyze the efficiency? –  Justin Dec 4 '09 at 14:45

There should not be any measurable difference, return statements should not generate any machinery. They should put a pointer to the string object (allocated on the heap) on the stack of the callsite.

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I don't think you mean reference here. :-) –  Konrad Dec 4 '09 at 17:58

The funny part is you worry about efficieny of break then return but make a new string every time.

The answer is it's up to the compiler, but it should not matter either way. Avoiding the new string will if you call this all the time.

The switch can often be optimized so that it performs a jump instead of a bunch of if else, but if you look in the assembly source you'll generally be underwhelmed by how little the optimizer does.

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