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I would like to create a helper that can be used like

@Html.MyHelperFor(m => m.Name)

this should return for example

<span name="Name" data-something="Name"></span>

if it is @Html.MyHelperFor(m => m.MailID) This should return

<span name="MailID" data-something="MailID"></span>

I should be able to access the Property name in the helper method to make this type of helper ,I think.

How can I do this?

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up vote 7 down vote accepted

You can do something like (the following will take additional HTML attributes too).

public static MvcHtmlString MyHelperFor<TModel, TValue>(this HtmlHelper<TModel> helper, Expression<Func<TModel, TValue>> expression, object htmlAttributes = null)
{
    var data = ModelMetadata.FromLambdaExpression(expression, helper.ViewData);
    string propertyName = data.PropertyName;
    TagBuilder span = new TagBuilder("span");
    span.Attributes.Add("name", propertyName);
    span.Attributes.Add("data-something", "something");

    if (htmlAttributes != null)
    {
        var attributes = HtmlHelper.AnonymousObjectToHtmlAttributes(htmlAttributes);
        span.MergeAttributes(attributes);
    }

    return new MvcHtmlString(span.ToString());
}
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1  
This should be added inside a static class under the namespace System.Web.Mvc.Html. – BornToCode Feb 18 '15 at 2:49
    
@BornToCode You know, I much prefer extensions written under the namespace of the type they refer to, otherwise other developers never make use of them if they don't know them as they'd need to know about them and the namespace that they live in in order to add a reference and use it. – mattytommo Feb 18 '15 at 8:43
    
The question asked for data-something="MailID" where yours sets it to "something". The example needs to show how to get at the value of the expression, not just the name of the property. – xr280xr May 29 '15 at 22:48

You can use the FromLambaExpression method from ModelMetadata like this:

namespace System.Web.Mvc.Html
{
    public static class CustomHelpers
    {
        public static MvcHtmlString MyHelperFor<TModel, TValue>(this HtmlHelper<TModel> helper, Expression<Func<TModel, TValue>> expression)
        {
            var metaData = ModelMetadata.FromLambdaExpression(expression, helper.ViewData);
            var name = metaData.PropertyName;
            // create your html string, you could defer to DisplayFor to render a span or
            // use the TagBuilder class to create a span and add your attributes to it
            string html = "";
            return new MvcHtmlString(html);
        }
    }
}

The ModelMetadata class is in the System.Web.Mvc namespace. The FromLambdaExpression method is what the built in helpers use so then you can be sure your helper will function the same as the built in helpers. By placing the CustomHelpers class inside the System.Web.Mvc.Html namespace you can then access your helper like you would the other helpers, i.e. @Html.MyHelperFor().

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This should get you started. This function directly returns the property name but you should be able to convert this into the extension you are looking for with a little work. This example has the correct method signature and the call to ExpressionHelper to get the name of your property.

    public static MvcHtmlString MyHelperFor<TModel, TValue>(this HtmlHelper<TModel> htmlHelper, Expression<Func<TModel, TValue>> expression)
    {
        string expressionName = ExpressionHelper.GetExpressionText(expression);

        return new MvcHtmlString(expressionName);
    }
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This anser helped me – Kuttan Sujith Aug 28 '13 at 6:45

Following up on mattytommo's answer, this works great but there is only a small problem when used with complex objects, such as if you are using this code for a property inside an EditorTemplate.

Instead of

var data = ModelMetadata.FromLambdaExpression(expression, helper.ViewData);
string propertyName = data.PropertyName;

If using MVC4, you can change it to

var propertyName = helper.NameFor(expression);

or for MVC3 and below

var propertyName = expression.Body.ToString();
propertyName = propertyName.Substring(propertyName.IndexOf(".") + 1);
if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(helper.ViewData.TemplateInfo.HtmlFieldPrefix))
    propertyName = string.Format("{0}.{1}", helper.ViewData.TemplateInfo.HtmlFieldPrefix, propertyName);

Full code:

    public static MvcHtmlString MyHelperFor<TModel, TValue>(this HtmlHelper<TModel> helper, Expression<Func<TModel, TValue>> expression, object htmlAttributes = null)
    {
        var propertyName = expression.Body.ToString();
        propertyName = propertyName.Substring(propertyName.IndexOf(".") + 1);
        if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(helper.ViewData.TemplateInfo.HtmlFieldPrefix))
            propertyName = string.Format("{0}.{1}", helper.ViewData.TemplateInfo.HtmlFieldPrefix, propertyName);

        TagBuilder span = new TagBuilder("span");
        span.Attributes.Add("name", propertyName);
        span.Attributes.Add("data-something", propertyName);

        if (htmlAttributes != null)
        {
            var attributes = HtmlHelper.AnonymousObjectToHtmlAttributes(htmlAttributes);
            span.MergeAttributes(attributes);
        }

        return new MvcHtmlString(span.ToString());
    }
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