Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to think of an algorithm to implement this for a given n bit binary number. I tried out many examples, but am unable to find out any pattern. So how shall I proceed?

share|improve this question
1  
This might be of use to you. –  G. Bach Aug 27 '13 at 19:21
1  
Five in binary is 101. You may find it easier to first think about an algorithm for checking a decimal number for divisibility by decimal 101. –  Patricia Shanahan Aug 27 '13 at 19:24
    
converting stuff would add to time ... –  notsogeek Aug 27 '13 at 19:29
    
possible duplicate of Binary divisibility by 10 –  A. Webb Aug 27 '13 at 19:48
    
@notsogeek I'm not saying to literally do it in decimal, but to use the corresponding decimal problem, divisibility by one more than the square of the radix, as an aid to thinking. –  Patricia Shanahan Aug 27 '13 at 20:05

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

How about this:

Convert the number to base 4 (this is trivial by simply combining pairs of bits). 5 in base 4 is 11. The values base 4 that are divisible by 11 are somewhat familiar: 11, 22, 33, 110, 121, 132, 203, ...

The rule for divisibility by 11 is that you add all the odd digits and all the even digits and subtract one from the other. If the result is divisible by 11 (which remember is 5), then it's divisible by 11 (which remember is 5).

For example:

123456d = 1 1110 0010 0100 0000b = 132021000_4

The even digits are 1 2 2 0 0 : sum = 5d
The odd digits are   3 0 1 0  : sum = 4d

Difference is 1, which is not divisble by 5

Or another one:

123455d = 1 1110 0010 0011 1111b = 132020333_4

The even digits are 1 2 2 3 3 : sum = 11d
The odd digits are   3 0 0 3  : sum = 6d

Difference is 5, which is a 5 or a 0

This should have a fairly efficient HW implementation because it's mostly bit-slicing, followed by N/2 adders, where N is the number of bits in the number you're interested in.

Note that after adding the digits and subtracting, the maximum value is 3/4 * N, so if you have 16-bit numbers max, you can get at most 12 as a result, so you only need to check for 0, ±5 and ±10 explicitly. If you're using 32-bit numbers then you can get at most 24 as a result, so you need to also check if the result is ±15 or ±20.

share|improve this answer
    
Shouldn't you also check for -5 and -10? –  Peter de Rivaz Aug 27 '13 at 20:59
    
Yes, also check for -5 and -10 –  JoshG79 Aug 27 '13 at 21:03

Make a Deterministic Finite Automaton (DFA) to implement the divisibility check and implement the DFA in hardware.

Creating a DFA for divisibility by 5 is easy. You just need to notice the remainders and check what 2r (mod 5) and 2r + 1(mod 5) map to. There are many websites that discuss this. For example this one.

There are well-known examples to convert DFA to a hardware representation as well.

share|improve this answer
    
I think you mean "deterministic finite automaton". –  G. Bach Aug 27 '13 at 22:52
    
Yes, been a while since I expanded the acronym :) Thanks –  user1952500 Aug 27 '13 at 23:05

The contribution of each bit toward being divisible by five is a four bit pattern 3421. You could shift through any binary number 4 bits at a time adding the corresponding value for positive bits.

Example:

100011

take 0011 apply the pattern 0021 sum 3

next four bits 0010 apply the pattern 0020 sum = 5

share|improve this answer

Well , I just figured out ... number mod 5 = a0 * 2^0 mod 5 + a1 * 2^1 mod 5 +a2* 2^2 mod 5 + a3 * 2^3 mod 5 + a4 * 2^4 mod 5 + .... = a0 (1) + a1(2) +a2 (-1) +a3 (-2) +a4 (1) repeats ...

Hence difference of odd digits + 2 times difference of even digits = divisible by 5

for example ... consider 110010
odd digits differnce = 0-0+1 = 1 or 01 even digits difference = 1-0+1 = 2 or 10

difference of odd digits + 2 times difference of even digits = 01 + 2*(10)=01 + 100 = 101 is divisible by 5 .

share|improve this answer

As any assignment this would have been an answer for is bound to be way overdue a year later:
in the binary representation of a natural divisible by five the parities of bits 4n and 4n+2 equal, as well as those for bits 4n+1 and 4n+3.
(This is entirely equivalent to the answers of JoshG79, notsogeek, or james: 4≡-1(mod 5), 3≡-2(mod 5) (with reduced hand-waving about recursion in argumentation, and no dispensable handling of carries in circuitry))

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.