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Let's say I have a structure representing a PDF document pdf and a structure representing one of its pages pdf_page:

typedef struct pdf_page {
    int page_no;
    pdf_page *next_page;
    char *content;
} pdf_page;

typedef struct {
    pdf_page *first_page, *last_page;
} pdf;

From my main(), I call create_pdf_file(pdf *doc):

void main() {
  pdf doc;
  create_pdf_file(&doc);
  // reading the linked list of pages here
}

Assume that create_pdf_file is something along these lines:

void
create_pdf_file(pdf *doc) {
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
        pdf_page p;
        p.page_no = i;
        p.contents = "Hello, World!";
        doc->last_page->next_page = p;
    }
}

(This is merely an example source code, so no list processing is shown. Obviously, the first_page and last_page members of pdf need to be set first.)

My question: If I access doc->first_page - as well as the other pages in the linked list - after the create_pdf_file() call in my main(), is it possible that I get segmentation faults because of "taking the local variable p out of its context"?

(I am not sure whether I have guaranteed that the corresponding memory location will not be used for something else.)

If so, how do I avoid this?

Thanks.

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I haven't used C in a while but I don't think you can pass a pdf into a function that is expecting a pdf *. –  Words Like Jared Aug 27 '13 at 19:21
    
Also pdf_page p is located only inside that for loop. Looking at your source I think you want to malloc each pdf_page p. –  Words Like Jared Aug 27 '13 at 19:24
    
Whoops, my bad. Sorry. –  David Aug 27 '13 at 19:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

yes, p is a local variable stored on the stack, when the lifetime ends (every loop iteration) any pointer to it gets invalid. you need to allocate every page with malloc() and free() it after you are finished. this would look similar to:

for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) 
{
        pdf_page* p = malloc(sizeof(pdf_page));
        p->page_no = i;
        p->contents = "Hello, World!";
        doc->last_page->next_page = p;
}

and when you call your function you have to pass a pointer to doc:

create_pdf_file(&doc);
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I corrected it, thank you. –  robin.koch Aug 27 '13 at 19:58

is it possible that I get segmentation faults because of "taking the local variable p out of its context"?

Once the block in which p is declared terminates, any pointer to p is invalid (a "dangling pointer") and attempting to dereference such a pointer is Undefined Behaviour. In other words, don't do it: you could get segmentation faults, or any other behaviour (including random memory corruption or the use of the wrong data without any error condition.)

(I am not sure whether I have guaranteed that the corresponding memory location will not be used for something else.)

You've guaranteed that the lifetime of p is shorter than a pointer to p.

If so, how do I avoid this?

Use malloc to dynamically allocate a memory region of the correct size to hold the datum. Don't forget to free the memory when you no longer need it.

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Thank you for your answer, too. I do not know how could I have forgotten about trying malloc(). –  David Aug 27 '13 at 19:34
1  
@EricPostpischil: Although I edited the answer, I believe that my use of "out of scope" is pretty normal. For example, ISO/IEC 9899:201x draft (n1570): section 6.2.4p7 "lifetime extends ... until execution of the program leaves the scope of the declaration." To be fair, p6 prefers the usage "until execution of that block ends in any way", but I think that it demonstrates that people writing in a much more formal context than SO feel that it's acceptable to say "leaves the scope". (The verb "leaves" and the verbal phrase "goes out of" are synonyms, at least in my idiolect of English.) –  rici Aug 27 '13 at 20:32

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