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I have a method named process in two of my Classes, lets say CLASS-A and CLASS-B. Now in the below loop, I am calling process method of both of my classes sequentially meaning one by one and it works fine but that is the not the way I am looking for.

for (ModuleRegistration.ModulesHolderEntry entry : ModuleRegistration.getInstance()) {
    final Map<String, String> response = entry.getPlugin().process(outputs);

    // write to database
    System.out.println(response);
}

Is there any way, I can call the process method of both of my classes in a multithreaded way. Meaning one thread will call process method of CLASS-A and second thread will call process method of CLASS-B.

And then after that I was thinking to write the data that is being returned by the process method into the database. So I can have one more thread for writing into database.

Below is the code that I came up with in a multithreaded way but somehow it is not running at all.

public void writeEvents(final Map<String, Object> data) {

    // Three threads: one thread for the database writer, two threads for the plugin processors
    final ExecutorService executor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(3);

    final BlockingQueue<Map<String, String>> queue = new LinkedBlockingQueue<Map<String, String>>();

    @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
    final Map<String, String> outputs = (Map<String, String>)data.get(ModelConstants.EVENT_HOLDER);

    for (final ModuleRegistration.ModulesHolderEntry entry : ModuleRegistration.getInstance()) {
        executor.submit(new Runnable () {
            public void run() {
                final Map<String, String> response = entry.getPlugin().process(outputs);
                // put the response map in the queue for the database to read
                queue.offer(response);
            }
        });
    }

    Future<?> future = executor.submit(new Runnable () {
        public void run() {
            Map<String, String> map;
            try {
                while(true) {
                    // blocks until a map is available in the queue, or until interrupted
                    map = queue.take();
                    // write map to database
                    System.out.println(map);
                }
            } catch (InterruptedException ex) {
                // IF we're catching InterruptedException then this means that future.cancel(true)
                // was called, which means that the plugin processors are finished;
                // process the rest of the queue and then exit
                while((map = queue.poll()) != null) {
                    // write map to database
                    System.out.println(map);
                }
            }
        }
    });

    // this interrupts the database thread, which sends it into its catch block
    // where it processes the rest of the queue and exits
    future.cancel(true); // interrupt database thread

    // wait for the threads to finish
    try {
        executor.awaitTermination(5, TimeUnit.MINUTES);
    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
        //log error here
    }
}

But If I remove the last line executor.awaitTermination(5, TimeUnit.MINUTES); then it start running fine and after some time, I always get error like this-

JVMDUMP006I Processing dump event "systhrow", detail "java/lang/OutOfMemoryError" - please wait.
JVMDUMP032I JVM requested Heap dump using 'S:\GitViews\Stream\goldseye\heapdump.20130827.142415.16456.0001.phd' in response to an event
JVMDUMP010I Heap dump written to S:\GitViews\Stream\goldseye\heapdump.20130827.142415.16456.0001.phd
JVMDUMP006I Processing dump event "systhrow", detail "java/lang/OutOfMemoryError" - please wait.

Can anybody help me in figuring out what's the problem and what wrong I am doing in my above code? if I am running sequentially then I don't get any errors and it works fine.

And also is there any better way of doing this as compared to the way I am doing? Because in future I can have multiple plugin processor as compared to two.

What I am trying to do is- Call the process method of both of my classes in a multithreaded way and then write into the database bcoz my process method will return back a Map.

Any help will be appreciated on this.. And I am looking for a workable example on this if possible. Thanks for the help,

share|improve this question
    
I'm not an expert on these things so I had to look up a lot of stuff. But I'd be concerned that future.cancel may interrupt something important (may even interrupt the BlockingQueue operations that are supposed to be atomic). Have you tried some other synchronization method? E.g. add a volatile boolean to your anonymous Runnable, add a method to set it, have your loop in the Runnable exit when the boolean is set, and have the other class use the "set" method instead of future.cancel. You'd have more control that way. But I'm just guessing. –  ajb Aug 27 '13 at 22:42
    
Doing what I suggested means you'll probably have to write a named subclass of Runnable, and declare a variable of that class, so that you can call the "set my cancel flag" method. –  ajb Aug 27 '13 at 22:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The code snippet you pasted has few issues, if you fix them, this should work.
1. You are using an infinite loop to fetch element from the blocking queue and trying to break this using future. This is definitely not a good approach. The problem with this approach is it is possible that your database thread would never run because it could be cancelled by the future task running in the caller thread even before it runs. This is error-prone.
- You should run the while loop fixed number of times (you already know how many producers are there or how many times you are going to get the response).

  1. Also, tasks submitted to executor service should be independent tasks...here your database task is dependent on the execution of other tasks..this can also lead to deadlock if your execution policy changes..for example if you use single thread pool executor and if database thread is scheduled it would just block waiting for producers to add data in the queue.

    • A good way is to create task that retrieves data and update the database in the same thread.
    • Or retrieve all the responses first and then execute database operations in parallel

    public void writeEvents(final Map data) {

    final ExecutorService executor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(3);       
    @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
    final Map<String, String> outputs = (Map<String, String>)data.get(ModelConstants.EVENT_HOLDER);
    
    for (final ModuleRegistration.ModulesHolderEntry entry : ModuleRegistration.getInstance()) {
        executor.submit(new Runnable () {
            public void run() {
                try {
                    final Map<String, String> response = entry.getPlugin().process(outputs);
                    //process the response and update database.
                    System.out.println(map);
                } catch (Throwable e) {
                    //handle execption
                } finally {
                    //clean up resources
                }               
            }
        });
    }
    

    // This will wait for running threads to complete ..it's an orderly shutdown. executor.shutdown(); }

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Amol for the suggestion. Some of your explanation makes sense to me. Is there any way, you can put an example for me basis on my code? Thanks for the help.. –  AKIWEB Aug 28 '13 at 6:06

OK, here's some code for the comments I suggested above. Disclaimer: I'm not sure whether it works or even compiles, or whether it solves the problem. But the idea is to take control of the cancellation process instead of relying on future.cancel which I suspect could cause problems.

class CheckQueue implements Runnable {
    private volatile boolean cancelled = false;
    public void cancel() { cancelled = true; }
    public void run() {
        Map<String, String> map;
        try {
            while(!cancelled) {
                // blocks until a map is available in the queue, or until interrupted
                map = queue.take();
                if (cancelled) break;
                // write map to database
                System.out.println(map);
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
        }
        while((map = queue.poll()) != null) {
            // write map to database
            System.out.println(map);
        }
    }
}

CheckQueue queueChecker = new CheckQueue ();
Future<?> future = executor.submit(queueChecker);

// this interrupts the database thread, which sends it into its catch block
// where it processes the rest of the queue and exits
queueChecker.cancel();
share|improve this answer
    
I am confuse with this approach as I am not sure how to integrate this with my cpde.. I am not able to make this work.. –  AKIWEB Aug 28 '13 at 3:25
    
@TrekkieTechieT-T: I made some errors that I've fixed in my edit. (My declaration of cancelled was messed up, and you still have to catch InterruptedException even if you're no longer relying on interrupts.) If you already got it to compile but it had the same results, then that means my guess was wrong. If you got it to compile but it made things worse, then I'd need to know just what the new bad behavior is. –  ajb Aug 28 '13 at 16:35

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