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Let's say I have ObjectA (of classA), which contains:

List<classB> bList;

now let's suppose that in each objectB there are a couple of threads which are running (they can't be accessed from outside objectB), threadB1 and threadB2.

Now, in a certain objectB of such list, threadB2 discovers that objectBRemove==true.

When that happens, I want to terminate all threads from such object and remove it from bList (I effectively want to destroy this objectB).

I thought I could rise an event inside objectB and subscribe a objectA's method to such event:

public void onObjectBRemove(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    bList.Remove((classB) sender);
}

When this is called after objectB's event rising this should remove objectB from the list. Then, the garbage collector should notice objectB becoming unreferenced and thus deleting it, also terminating all internal threads.

Is this supposed to work? Is this a reasonable approach to the problem at hand?

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When this is called after objectB's event rising this should remove objectB from the list. Then, the garbage collector should notice objectB becoming unreferenced and thus deleting it, also terminating all internal threads.

This will remove the object from the list - but List<T> is not thread safe, so you'll need synchronization (or a thread safe collection, such as ConcurrentBag<T>).

Note that this won't terminate running threads. If you want to stop an operation that's running, you should use .NET's cooperative cancellation and set a CancellationTokenSource to it's canceled state, at which point your thread can exit itself gracefully.

share|improve this answer
    
Following your good advice, I've replaced concurrently accessed Lists with ConcurrentBags. So, apart from the question at hand, I should no more user Monitor.TryEnter / Monitor.Exit when accessing them right? As of now I'm reading the part about cooperative cancellation and then try to implement what you said. I'll let you know about the results. – Carlo Arnaboldi Aug 27 '13 at 23:04
    
@CarloArnaboldi Yes - you can add/remove items from ConcurrentBag<T> without lock or monitor.enter... – Reed Copsey Aug 27 '13 at 23:05
    
Just a quick note to let you know that I managed to close other threads just by checking TcpClient.Connected value. Of course you couldn't suggest that since I didn't expose any detail of my program. Thanks anyway for the useful advice, I'll keep that in mind for future reference. – Carlo Arnaboldi Aug 28 '13 at 0:36

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