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My actual idea is not compiling due to C++ language limitation (templated virtual functions are not supported). Maybe some of you have some design recommendations for the following code snippet.

I want to run different algorithms on different types of inputs. For example I have as input an integral image and an grayscale image. The integral image needs 32 bit for a pixel and my grayscale image needs 8 bit (just as an example). Therefore, I have two channels: CChannel<uint8> and CChannel<uint32>

Since I could have multiple channels for a single image, I store the channels in a vector, std::vector<CChannelBase*>... That's the justification of the class CChannelBase.

class CChannelBase
{
public:
    virtual ~CChannelBase( void ) = 0;
};

template <class ValueType>
class CChannel : public CChannelBase
{
public:
    typedef ValueType value_type_t;
    Channel(): m_data_p(0) {}
    void setData(ValueType* f_data_p) { m_data_p = f_data_p; }
    const ValueType getData( void ) { return m_data_p; }
private:
    ValueType* m_data_p;
};

All my algorithms implement an interface and must be compatible with each image channel.

class IAlgorithmInterface
{
public:
    virtual ~IAlgorithmInterface() = 0;
    template <class ValueType>
    virtual void doWork(const CChannel<ValueType>* f_channel_p, float32_t& f_result_r);
};

class CAlgorithmA : IAlgorithmInterface
{
    CAlgorithmA() {...};
    ~CAlgorithmA() {...};
    template <class ValueType>
    void doWork(const CChannel<ValueType>* f_channel_p, float32_t& f_result_r) {...};
};

class CAlgorithmB : IAlgorithmInterface
{
    CAlgorithmB() {...};
    ~CAlgorithmB() {...};
    template <class ValueType>
    void doWork(const CChannel<ValueType>* f_channel_p, float32_t& f_result_r) {...};
};

Of course this code is not compiling since we have virtual template functions. Anyway, I am looking for a nice design to overcome this problem. A solution is that all classes (IAlgorithmInterface, CAlgorithmA, CAlgorithmB) are templatized which is a thing I do not want to do. I saw a few posts here, where the visitor pattern is recommended. But to be honest, I do not see how to use it in my case.

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7  
Calling virtual templates a "missing language feature" is like saying that your career as a star cryptanalyst is currently on hold due to life's missing constant-time prime factorisation feature. –  Kerrek SB Aug 27 '13 at 22:00
    
Are you saying that each algorithm needs to be able handle multiple different value types, but they are always handled in the exact same way? –  jxh Aug 27 '13 at 22:21
    
yes, but the pointer type of the image array is not known before. of course I can reinterpret a given pointer but then something will go wrong. @kerreksb: read my text again :) –  bobby Aug 27 '13 at 22:31
2  
There's a good reason we don't have templated virtual functions: They make no sense. virtual means "implement via inheritance" whereas template means "inherit implementation". What you actually want here are traits and functors, like stl uses. Look at how STL's allocators work and that should help you start to solve the problem you're describing in a C++ way. –  kfsone Aug 27 '13 at 22:41
3  
The only way this can possibly work is to write down all the possible types for ValueType. I.e. make your doWork function accept a variant<ChannelTypeA,ChannelTypeB,..., etc.> object. Which is equivalent to write multiple overloads of doWork (but maybe variant's visitors will save up some boiler code) –  sbabbi Aug 27 '13 at 23:09

2 Answers 2

Not sure if this solves all of your problems, since there isn't much to go on as to what you actually want this code to actually "do", but with a little bit of shuffling, it compiles:

typedef float float32_t;

class CChannelBase
{
public:
    virtual ~CChannelBase( void ) = 0;
};

template <class ValueType>
class CChannel : public CChannelBase
{
public:
    typedef ValueType value_type_t;
    CChannel(): m_data_p(0) {}
    void setData(ValueType* f_data_p) { m_data_p = f_data_p; }
    const ValueType getData( void ) { return m_data_p; }
private:
    ValueType* m_data_p;
};

template <class ValueType>
class IAlgorithmInterface
{
public:
    virtual ~IAlgorithmInterface() = 0;
    virtual void doWork(const CChannel<ValueType>* f_channel_p, float32_t& f_result_r);
};

template <class ValueType>
class CAlgorithmA : IAlgorithmInterface<ValueType>
{
    CAlgorithmA() {};
    ~CAlgorithmA() {};
    void doWork(const CChannel<ValueType>* f_channel_p, float32_t& f_result_r) {};
};

template <class ValueType>
class CAlgorithmB : IAlgorithmInterface<ValueType>
{
    CAlgorithmB() {};
    ~CAlgorithmB() {};
    void doWork(const CChannel<ValueType>* f_channel_p, float32_t& f_result_r) {};
};


int main()
{
}

In essence, just move the templace<class ValueType> out a level, to the class, and add it to theIAloorithmInferface` inheritance.

I fully expect to be told that this won't work for what you are trying to do, but there is no example of what you actually want these classes to do, so I can't really tell if it works or not.

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thank you for your answer. I already wrote in my post, that I want to avoid this (working) solution. –  bobby Aug 27 '13 at 22:36
    
But you still want to use a template for ValueType, yes? I'm not entirely sure how you see that working, to be fair. You can't have one class, with one virtual function, that takes multiple types. The doWork function will take one slot in the vtable, for the calling code to use. You can't really call the same function with different arguments, since the callee function needs to know what the arguments are. So I just don't see how the compiler is supposed to figure out how to do that. But then I suppose you expect the compiler to just magically solve the problem... –  Mats Petersson Aug 27 '13 at 22:59
    
no I do not suppose any magic and I am aware of the problem :) I am just looking for a way to avoid to templatize the whole class. But if there is no other nice way to overcome I have to do it. –  bobby Aug 27 '13 at 23:02
    
So, exactly how do you expect it to actually work? That the compiler knows what you want to do, and fixes up the vtable accordingly? Remember for classes with virtual functions, you have one vtable per class [unless you have mutliple inheritance]. So if you have different types (CChannel<ValueType> with different type for ValueType), how is this going to be solved? Obviously, we could instantiate all the variants in each class, if ValueType isn't too many different types. –  Mats Petersson Aug 27 '13 at 23:05
    
Let me have a little play - I think there may be a way to work around it - but you'll still have to do a fair bit of work to cover all different pixelformats. –  Mats Petersson Aug 27 '13 at 23:12

Okay, this is kind of convoluted, but you have kind of a convoluted requirement. IAlgorithmInterface can have a template method, but it can't be virtual. You can create an intermediate class that itself is a template virtually derived from IAlgorithmInterface which proxies the template method to some code that does the real work. The real work is provided in a template parameter fed to templated derivation of IAlgorithmInterface.

This scheme allows the template method of IAlgorithmInterface to dispatch to the appropriate derived class via a downcast.

class IAlgorithmInterface
{
public:
    virtual ~IAlgorithmInterface() {}

    template <class ValueType>
    void doWork(const CChannel<ValueType>* f_channel_p, float32_t& f_result_r);    
};

template <class ValueType, typename RealWork>
class IAlgorithmTemplate : virtual public IAlgorithmInterface
{
public:
    void doWork(const CChannel<ValueType>* f_channel_p, float32_t& f_result_r) {
        RealWork()(f_channel_p, f_result_r);
    }
};

template <class ValueType>
void IAlgorithmInterface::doWork(const CChannel<ValueType>* f_channel_p,
                                 float32_t& f_result_r)
{
    IAlgorithmTemplate<ValueType> *alg
        = dynamic_cast<IAlgorithmTemplate<ValueType>*>(this);
    alg->doWork(f_channel_p, f_result_r);
}

Now, via multiple inheritance, we can create the actual interface that algorithm implementations would use. Because IAlgorithmTemplate uses virtual inheritance, there is only one IAlgorithmInterface instance. So to support ValueTypeNew, you would add a IAlgorithmTempalte<ValueTypeNew> to the inheritance list.

template <template <class> class RealWork>
class IAlgorithmBase :
    public IAlgorithmTemplate<ValueTypeOne, RealWork<ValueTypeOne> >,
    public IAlgorithmTemplate<ValueTypeTwo, RealWork<ValueTypeTwo> >,
    //...
    public IAlgorithmTemplate<ValueTypeLast, RealWork<ValueTypeLast> > {
};

Finally, each algorithm derives from IAlgorithmBase, and implements the RealWork as a template.

template <class ValueType>
struct RealAlgorithmA {
    void operator () (const CChannel<ValueType>* f_channel_p, float32_t& f_result_r) {
        //...
    }
};

class CAlgorithmA : public IAlgorithmBase<RealAlgorithmA>
{
public:
    CAlgorithmA() {...}
    ~CAlgorithmA() {...}
};
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