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I am stumped by this and obviously missing something basic. It seems perl sort is not working on particular set of value. Here is part of test code:

    use strict;

    my $i = 7;
    my $j = 8;
    my $k = 4;

    print "before:$i:$j:$k\n";
    my @p = ($i, $j, $k);
    ($i, $j, $k) = sort(@p);
    print "after:$i:$j:$k\n";

    print "######################################\n";


    my $i = 23;
    my $j = 24;
    my $k = 7;

    print "before:$i:$j:$k\n";
    my @p = ($i, $j, $k);
    ($i, $j, $k) = sort(@p);
    print "after:$i:$j:$k\n";

print "######################################\n";

As you can see, it works when input values are (7:8:4). Doesn't seem to work when values are (23:24:7)!

before:7:8:4
after:4:7:8
######################################
before:23:24:7
after:23:24:7
######################################
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Storing the array back into the individual variables seems a bit odd, and not something you'd probably do in a real-world program. You can just print the array itself: print "after: @p\n" –  Keith Thompson Aug 27 '13 at 22:28

1 Answer 1

up vote 11 down vote accepted

By default, sort will sort lexically. So 23 and 24 come before 7 for the same reason that bc and bd come before g in the dictionary.

sort {$a <=> $b} @p will yield a numeric sort.

http://perldoc.perl.org/functions/sort.html for more info.

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Thanks for the explanation and link! It's working now. –  Mandar Aug 27 '13 at 22:23
1  
(Dictionaries use language-specific collation orders. This isn't the same as sort's default. You'd use Unicode::Collate for that.) –  ikegami Aug 28 '13 at 2:01

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