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I am new to Objective C and I'm having trouble getting my head around a few things.

I am trying to make a big integer program, from which I read items entered in a string and put them into an individual elements in the array.

I am currently working on an add method which adds elements from both the arrays together to make a big number stored in a final array.

But I'm kind of confused about to get this array I made from the initWithString method into the array method. I have some understanding of self, but I don't really know how to use it in this sense.

    @implementation MPInteger

    {    
    }

    -(id) initWithString: (NSString *) x
    {
        self = [super init];
        if (self) {
        NSMutableArray *intString = [NSMutableArray array];
        for (int i = 0; i < [x length]; i++) {
            NSString *ch = [x substringWithRange:NSMakeRange(i, 1)];
            [intString addObject:ch];
        }
        }
        return self;
    }

    -(NSString *) description
    {
        return self.description;
    }


-(MPInteger *) add: (MPInteger *) x
{
    //NSMutableArray *arr1 = [NSMutableArray arrayWithCapacity:100];
    //NSMutableArray *arr2 = [NSMutableArray arrayWithCapacity:100];
    //for (int i=0; i < 100; i++) {
        //int r = arc4random_uniform(1000);
        //NSNumber *n = [NSNumber numberWithInteger:r];
        //[arr1 addObject:n];
        //[arr2 addObject:n];

   // }

    self.array = [NSMutableArray initialize];




    return x;


}

@end



int main(int argc, const char * argv[]) {

    @autoreleasepool {
        MPInteger *x = [[MPInteger alloc] initWithString:@"123456789"];
        MPInteger *y = [[MPInteger alloc] initWithString:@"123456789"];

        [x add: y];

    }
}

So I want too add the x and y arrays, but I'm not sure how to get the arrays in the add method. Do I use self to represent one of the arrays and initialise it, and x to represent the other. I don't know if I'm going about it completely the wrong way. Some help to understand would be greatly appreciated.

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What is MPInteger's superclass? –  rdelmar Aug 28 '13 at 3:11
    
The superclass is NSObject. –  courtney Aug 28 '13 at 3:14
1  
intString needs to be a property, so that it will persist after the init method finishes. Then later, in add:, you can refer to it with self.intString. –  rdelmar Aug 28 '13 at 4:01
    
do i need to synthesize intstring if i make it a property? –  courtney Aug 28 '13 at 4:19
    
No, that's done automatically now, and the ivar you get is the same as the property name with an underscore in front of it. In an init method you should use the ivar, so _intString = [NSMutableArray array]; –  rdelmar Aug 28 '13 at 4:21
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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

When referring to self you're actually accessing the current instance of the class. In other languages this may be implemented as this instead. There are a couple ways of designing the approach you're going for but the simplest pattern is probably composition:

@interface MPInteger
{
  NSMutableArray *digits;
}

@end

---------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

@implementation MPInteger

-(id) initWithString: (NSString *) x
{
    // Create a new instance of this class (MPInteger) with a default
    // constructor and assign it to the current instance (self).
    self = [super init];
    if (self) {

    // Previously we initialized a string, but then threw it out!
    // Instead, let's save it to our string representation:
    self->digits = [NSMutableArray array];
    for (int i = 0; i < [x length]; i++) {
        NSString *ch = [x substringWithRange:NSMakeRange(i, 1)];
        [self->digits addObject:ch];
    }
    return self;
}

// Depending on how you want to implement this function, it could return
// a new MPInteger class or update the current instance (self):
-(MPInteger *) add: (MPInteger *) x
{
    NSArray *a = self->digits;
    NSArray *b = x->digits;

    // Have both strings for A + B, so use them to find C:
    NSArray *c = ????;

    // Return a new instance of MPInteger with the result:
    return [ [ MPInteger alloc ] initWithString:c ];
}

@end

Notice that now the MPInteger class has an instance of an NSString object that will exist during the entire lifetime of the MPInteger object. To update/access this string, all you need to do is say:

self->digits
share|improve this answer
1  
Several things: Ivar access is normally done either directly: stringRepresentation = foo; or preferably through a property either through method calling syntax [self setStringRepresentationL:foo]; or through dot notation self.stringRepresentation = foo No one ever writes self->stringRepresentation = foo; in Objective-C, it is so rare to do it that way that I didn't even know it was an option until I tried it just now (been using the language actively for five years). Secondly, this code will crash when the stringRepresentation is accessed in a non-Automatic Reference Counting. –  BergQuester Aug 28 '13 at 3:54
    
Okay so I tried that, and then I got no visible @interface for NSString declares the selector addObject.. –  courtney Aug 28 '13 at 3:54
    
While I know that this isn't a problem with the answer itself, the name stringRepresentation suggests a string object and so is misleading. characterArray or characters would be more descriptive. Perhaps digits as it sounds like it is intended for numerical characters. –  BergQuester Aug 28 '13 at 3:55
1  
Using -> in preference to properties has some downsides. There's no way to funnel access to the instance variable through a custom accessor method in the future. It can set the stage for breaking encapsulation between objects. Also, it's just not common or idiomatic Objective-C. Furthermore, I don't see how eschewing use of properties could address the question, and finally, NSString and NSMutableArray aren't type compatible, so sending addObject: to it will produce compile-time warnings or errors, and set the stage for crashes if forced. –  Carl Veazey Aug 28 '13 at 4:40
    
My mistake - I wrote string representation but it should be an NSMutableArray. Thanks, Carl. As for the ivar access, that's just how I prefer to use/interactive with private variables. But BergQuester is also correct, you could do @properties and use [self setDigits:...]. I've updated the answer to use an NSMutableArray. –  Bryan Chacosky Aug 28 '13 at 13:34
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