Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I find that ggplot2 sometimes produces too few tick marks when using scale_y_log10. I am trying to produce plots automatically from arbitrary data, and I'm looking for a way to increase the number of tick marks without explicitly specifying them (since I don't know ahead of time what the data will be). For instance, here's a function to create a simple scatterplot with a log-y-scale:

example_plot <- function(x) {
  p <- ggplot(d, aes(x=MW, y=rel.Ki)) + 
    geom_point() +
    scale_y_log10()
  p
}

This will often work well, but with the following data

d <- structure(list(MW = c(89.09, 174.2, 147.13, 75.07, 131.17, 131.17, 146.19, 149.21, 165.19, 115.13, 181.19, 117.15), rel.Ki = c(2.91438577473767, 1, 1.07761254731238, 1.0475715900998, 0.960123906592881, 0.480428471483881,  1.50210548081627, 0.318457530434953, 0.458477212731015, 1.92246139937586,  0.604121577795352, 2.4111345825694)), .Names = c("MW", "rel.Ki"), class = "data.frame", row.names = c(1L, 6L, 11L, 16L, 21L, 26L, 31L, 36L, 41L, 47L, 54L, 59L))

it produces

print(example_plot(d))

enter image description here

The single tick mark on the y axis is not very helpful. Is there any way I can prevent this situation, short of rewriting the automatic tick-position-picking function?

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried setting the y limits to c(1,10) or c(1,100), after you set the axes to be logarithmic? –  Andy Clifton Aug 28 '13 at 5:14
1  
If you don't have to use ggplot a standard old with(d,plot(MW,rel.Ki,log="y")) gives nearly the exact same results but with sensible y-axis point choices. –  thelatemail Aug 28 '13 at 5:21
    
As I state in the post, I really can't explicitly set the limits, since I don't know what the range of the data will be - the problem is that the tick selection sometimes works poorly. –  Drew Steen Aug 28 '13 at 5:21
1  
@thelatemail +1 for convincing me that base graphics is good for something! –  Drew Steen Aug 28 '13 at 5:23
1  
you can set the limits using c(10^floor(log10(min(rel.Ki,na.rm=TRUE))), 10^ceiling(log10(max(rel.Ki,na.rm=TRUE)))). This gives me c(0.1,10), as you'd expect. –  Andy Clifton Aug 28 '13 at 5:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

An interesting discovery I just made by reading ?continuous_scale is that the breaks argument can be:

a function, that when called with a single argument, a character vector giving the limits of the scale, returns a character vector specifying which breaks to display.

So to guarantee a certain number of breaks, you could do something like:

break_setter = function(lims) {
  return(seq(from=as.numeric(lims[1]), to=as.numeric(lims[2]), length.out=5))
}

ggplot(d, aes(x=MW, y=rel.Ki)) + 
    geom_point() +
    scale_y_log10(breaks=break_setter)

Obviously the very simple example function is not very well adapted to the logarithmic nature of the data, but it does show how you could approach this a bit more programmatically.


You can also use pretty, which takes a suggestion for a number of breaks and returns nice round numbers. Using

break_setter = function(lims) {
    return(pretty(x = as.numeric(lims), n = 5))
}

yields the following:

logbreaks

Even better, we can make break_setter() return an appropriate function with whatever n you want and a default of, say, 5.

break_setter = function(n = 5) {
   function(lims) {pretty(x = as.numeric(lims), n = n)}
}

ggplot(d, aes(x=MW, y=rel.Ki)) + 
    geom_point() +
    scale_y_log10(breaks=break_setter())  ## 5 breaks as above

ggplot(d, aes(x=MW, y=rel.Ki)) + 
    geom_point() +
    scale_y_log10(breaks=break_setter(20))
share|improve this answer
    
Even better, use pretty: break_setter = function(lims) { return(pretty(x = as.numeric(lims), n = 5)) } to get nice round numbers. –  Gregor Aug 28 '13 at 22:07
    
Sorry I kind of high-jacked your answer! –  Gregor Aug 28 '13 at 23:43
    
@shujaa: No worries, it's definitely an improvement over the very basic proof of concept I had. –  Marius Aug 28 '13 at 23:49
    
so here you are using the lims from my answer? Just wondering. –  Andy Clifton Aug 29 '13 at 4:34
    
@AndyClifton: No, when you use a function as the breaks argument in a continuous_scale, it takes the automatically determined limits and feeds them through the function. –  Marius Aug 29 '13 at 4:43

You can set the limits programmatically. For example, using the data you provide, we can define the limits in the function like this:

example_plot <- function(x){
  # identify the range of data
  lims <- c(10^floor(log10(min(x$rel.Ki, na.rm=TRUE))), 
    10^ceiling(log10(max(x$rel.Ki, na.rm=TRUE))))
  # require ggplot2
  require('ggplot2')
  # create the plot
  p <- ggplot(data = x, aes(x = MW, y = rel.Ki)) + 
    geom_point() +
    scale_y_log10(limits = lims)
  p
}

print(example_plot(d))

Then you get a plot with ticks at the nearest decade:

How to set limits programmatically

Then, if you want to add a logarithmic grid, use the breaks option to scale_y_log10() as Marius et al. suggest:

 example_plot <- function(x){
  # identify the range of data      
  lims <- c(10^floor(log10(min(x$rel.Ki, na.rm=TRUE))), 
            10^ceiling(log10(max(x$rel.Ki, na.rm=TRUE))))  
   # require ggplot2
  require('ggplot2')
  # create the plot
  p <- ggplot(data = x, aes(x = MW, y = rel.Ki)) + 
    geom_point() +
    scale_y_log10(breaks = pretty(x = lims, n = 5),
                  limits = lims) 
  p 
}

print(example_plot(d))

Personally I prefer logarithmic plots to show at least an order of magnitude variation, so this approach helps ensure that happens.

enter image description here

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.