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I'm a newbie to C++.I wrote a simple program to implement the use of friend functions. The code is as follows:-

#include<iostream>

using namespace std;

class one
{
   private:
       int age;
   public:
       one()
       {
           age=1;
       }

       void setData(int num)
       {
           age=num;
       }

   friend int returnOne()
   {
       return age;
   }
};

class two
{
   private:
       int roll;
   public:
       two()
       {
          roll=0;
       }

       void setData(int num)
       {
          roll=num;
       }

   friend int returnTwo()
   {
       return roll;
   }
};

int main()
{
    one a;
    two b;
    cout<<a.returnOne()<<endl<<b.returnTwo()<<endl;
}

I'm getting the following error in c++.

friend.cpp: In function ‘int returnOne()’:
friend.cpp:8:6: error: invalid use of non-static data member ‘one::age’
friend.cpp:20:9: error: from this location
friend.cpp: In function ‘int returnTwo()’:
friend.cpp:27:6: error: invalid use of non-static data member ‘two::roll’
friend.cpp:39:9: error: from this location
friend.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
friend.cpp:47:10: error: ‘class one’ has no member named ‘returnOne’
friend.cpp:47:31: error: ‘class two’ has no member named ‘returnTwo’

EDIT Thanks.It solved the problem.

But it now leads me to another question.Isn't the friend keyword now compromised the purpose of using private,as now any class or function can simply use the friend function to access private data members.If yes,them we could have simply declared the data member as public instead of private.Whats so special in using private?

share|improve this question
    
This question title immediately made me think of a particular song by Joe Cocker. :-} –  Frerich Raabe Aug 28 '13 at 7:53
    
@FrerichRaabe you mean by The Beatles? –  juanchopanza Aug 28 '13 at 8:00
    
@juanchopanza: You're right! I just always think of the version by Joe Cocker. Now that you mention it, I remember that the song was specifically written for Ringo because he could single only a few (five?) different tones. Anyway, I'm getting distracted... –  Frerich Raabe Aug 28 '13 at 8:03
    

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

look at this link

A friend function is a function that is not a member of a class but has access to the class's private and protected members. Friend functions are not considered class members; they are normal external functions that are given special access privileges. Friends are not in the class's scope, and they are not called using the member-selection operators (. and –>) unless they are members of another class. A friend function is declared by the class that is granting access. The friend declaration can be placed anywhere in the class declaration. It is not affected by the access control keywords.

share|improve this answer
    
:Thanks it solved the problem.But it now leads me to another question.Isn't the friend keyword now compromised the purpose of using private.If yes,them we could have simply declared the data member as public instead of private.Whats so special in using private? –  Insane Coder Aug 28 '13 at 8:05
    
@InsaneCoder private basically means nobody can access it except for the class itself and its friends. public would give access to everyone. –  juanchopanza Aug 28 '13 at 8:07
1  
@InsaneCoder yes and no: no - because the class is responsible to say if there is a friend function and doesn't have to give a friend function. yes - if the class gave a friend function that everyone can use and told the world what the friend class is and what private member she has then the class is compromised –  No Idea For Name Aug 28 '13 at 8:09
    
It' worth mentioning that when you have to use friend function/classes it usually means that there's something wrong with design of your application. So learn about them, but try to use them as little as possible. ;) –  Dino Aug 31 '13 at 8:35

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