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I have the below code

public Long getEpochTime(String dateToGetItsEpoch) throws ParseException
{
    TimeZone timeZone = TimeZone.getTimeZone("UTC");
    final String REQUEST_DATE_FORMAT = "dd/MM/yyyy h:m";

    DateFormat format = new SimpleDateFormat(REQUEST_DATE_FORMAT);
    Date localDate = format.parse(dateToGetItsEpoch);

    Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance(timeZone);
    cal.setTime(localDate);

    format.setTimeZone(timeZone);
    final String utcTime = format.format(cal.getTime());

    Date d = cal.getTime();

    return d.getTime();
}

If I change the locale of my device to whatever, I always get the UTC time as the return value. Which is correct, however I want to know how is this happening ? How does the device know Which timezone is the date I am giving to it so that it calculates accordingly ?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A Date doesn't have a time zone at all. A SimpleDateFormat does as a default for parsing and formatting; a Calendar does too; a Date doesn't.

Given this sequence of operations:

TimeZone timeZone = TimeZone.getTimeZone("UTC");
DateFormat format = new SimpleDateFormat(REQUEST_DATE_FORMAT);
Date localDate = format.parse(dateToGetItsEpoch);

Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance(timeZone);
cal.setTime(localDate);

format.setTimeZone(timeZone);
final String utcTime = format.format(cal.getTime());

... you're initially parsing the string using the default time zone of the device, then you're formatting it in UTC. Note that the Calendar part is irrelevant here - you'd get the same result with:

TimeZone timeZone = TimeZone.getTimeZone("UTC");
DateFormat format = new SimpleDateFormat(REQUEST_DATE_FORMAT);
Date date = format.parse(dateToGetItsEpoch);
format.setTimeZone(timeZone);
final String utcTime = format.format(date);

I would personally recommend using Joda Time where possible for date/time work in Java, mind you. It's a much cleaner API than Calendar/Date.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the prompt reply. If I apply your suggested method, how do I get the new UTC time in epoch ? and regarding to your line 'you're initially parsing the string using the default time zone of the device'.. we are doing that here right ? Date localDate = format.parse(dateToGetItsEpoch); and this happens by default ? –  tony9099 Aug 28 '13 at 8:33
1  
@tony9099: I don't know what you mean by "the new UTC time in epoch". But yes, when you call format.parse without having specified a time zone (or calendar) on the SimpleDateFormat, it will use the default time zone. –  Jon Skeet Aug 28 '13 at 8:38
    
I mean, how can I convert the 'utcTime' into an epoch time if I do not have it inside date using your second suggested method. –  tony9099 Aug 28 '13 at 8:41
1  
@tony9099: Again, what do you mean by "an epoch time"? You can just return date.getTime(). A Date doesn't have a time zone - it's always a "millis since the unix epoch" wrapper, basically. So when you parse the string using the default time zone, it's converting it into that value already. –  Jon Skeet Aug 28 '13 at 8:54
    
@Johskeet, sorry I did not know that. Thanks a lot,, now utcTime is already in millies. Thanks a million for clarifying this to me. –  tony9099 Aug 28 '13 at 9:09

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