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I read in "The C Programming Language ANSI edition by Kernighan and Ritchie" that if I call a function with a return type either int or void inside another function before actually declaring/defining it, it should work perfectly. But when I run it on codeblocks I still get a warning.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>
int main()
{
    display();
}
void display()
{
    printf("Hello World\n");
}

The warning being: "Conflicting types for display".

But if i change the program to:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>
void display()
{
    printf("Hello World\n");
}
int main()
{
    display();
}

It works without any warnings. Why is that? Please help.

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2  
You can also cross major roads with your eyes shut but that doesn't make it a good idea. –  paxdiablo Aug 28 '13 at 8:34
    
@amiageek I realise you are quite new here, but you may like to consider accepting the best answer on each of your three questions. See here: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/5234 –  David Heffernan Aug 28 '13 at 8:52
    
Thanks for introducing me to this concept. –  amiageek Aug 28 '13 at 8:59

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You are calling display before declaring it. When you do so the compiler makes an assumption over the type of the return value. It assumes that it is int. But when you define the function you use a return value of type void which is the conflict.

It's been a very long time since anybody thought it was sound to call functions that have not been declared. So, declare all functions before calling them. It's best to configure your compiler so that it rejects attempts to call functions that have not been declared.

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Got it, thanks! –  amiageek Aug 28 '13 at 8:34

you are calling the function before declaring it. If you have read the book somewhere there is mentioned function prototype deceleration.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>
void display(void);  // function prototype decleration
int main()
{
    display();
}
void display()
{
    printf("Hello World\n");
}

Hope this helps so always define a prototype.

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Use a function prototype before the main function like so:

void display();

int main()
{
    display();
}

void display()
{
    printf("Hello World\n");
}
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If the function is called when the compiler hasn't seen its prototype, it assumes that the return type is int.

However, this feature(called implicit function declaration) is removed since C99 and you should never rely on it.

Using a function declaration is clearly a better choice:

void display(void);
int main(void)
{
    display();
}
void display(void)
{
    printf("Hello World\n");
}
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Only int return type is assumed by default not void. You must refer to a newer standard.

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