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I'm trying to implement the ITableEntity interface so that I can add [DataContract] attribute on it. But if I implement this interface myself, I'll have to give the ReadEntity and WriteEntity methods a body.

But there is a class that already implements the ITableEntity interface and gave ReadEntity and WriteEntity methods a body, which is the TableEntity.cs.

How can I make my implementation of the interface use the methods in the TableEntity class?

[Edit]

[DataContract]
public class SerializableTableEntity : ITableEntity 
{
    private TableEntity tableEntity;

    public string ETag { get; set; }
    public string PartitionKey { get; set; }
    public string RowKey { get; set; }
    public DateTimeOffset Timestamp { get; set; }

    public SerializableTableEntity()
    {
        tableEntity = new TableEntity();
    }

    public void ReadEntity(IDictionary<string, EntityProperty> properties, Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Storage.OperationContext operationContext)
    {
        tableEntity.ReadEntity(properties, operationContext);
    }

    public IDictionary<string, EntityProperty> WriteEntity(Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Storage.OperationContext operationContext)
    {
        return tableEntity.WriteEntity(operationContext);
    }
}
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Maybe I don't understand your issue, but do you want to derive from the class TableEntity, i.e. make that class the base class of your class? Because if you did, you would inherit the methods and the interface "for free". –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Aug 28 '13 at 12:50
    
Hi, that's what I did initially, but I need to be able to serialize the TableEntity class and the TableEntity class doesn't have a [DataContract] attribute decorated on the class. So I'm stuck with creating my own implementation. –  Yustme Aug 28 '13 at 12:57

4 Answers 4

The reason that every property in your stored table is blank is because WriteEntity and ReadEntity use the blank object to store and write the data.

You're delegating serialization of your object to 'tableEntity' but none of your properties are there.

Suggestion: you will need to implement all of your SerializableTableEntity's properties inside a class that derives from TableEntity, contain a variable of that type inside the SerializableTableEntity entity, and delegate every member's property get/set from SerializableTableEntity to this new object.

Does this make sense?

EDIT: Code sample as requested (you're not going to enjoy it though)

    [DataContract]
public class SerializableTableEntity : ITableEntity
{
    private CustomEntity tableEntity;

    public string ETag { 
    {
        get
        {
            return tableEntity.ETag;
        }
        set
        {
            tableEntity.Etag = value;
        }
    }

    public string PartitionKey
    {
        get
        {
            return tableEntity.PartitionKey;
        }
        set
        {
            tableEntity.PartitionKey = value;
        }
    }

    public string RowKey
    {
        get
        {
            return tableEntity.RowKey;
        }
        set
        {
            tableEntity.RowKey = value;
        }
    }

    public DateTimeOffset Timestamp
    {
        get
        {
            return tableEntity.Timestamp;
        }
        set
        {
            tableEntity.Timestamp = value;
        }
    }

    public string PropertyOne
    {
        get
        {
            return tableEntity.PropertyOne;
        }
        set
        {
            tableEntity.PropertyOne = value;
        }
    }


    public SerializableTableEntity()
    {
        tableEntity = new CustomEntity();
    }

    public void ReadEntity(IDictionary<string, EntityProperty> properties, Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Storage.OperationContext operationContext)
    {
        tableEntity.ReadEntity(properties, operationContext);
    }

    public IDictionary<string, EntityProperty> WriteEntity(Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Storage.OperationContext operationContext)
    {
        return tableEntity.WriteEntity(operationContext);
    }
}

public class CustomEntity : TableEntity
{
    public string PropertyOne { get; set; }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes it makes sense. But I didn't completely understood what you mean with your suggestion. Are you saying that all the objects i want to store in the table, have to be added in the SerializableTableEntity class? –  Yustme Aug 28 '13 at 16:22
    
Igorek, a small code sample would be nice if you got the time. –  Yustme Aug 28 '13 at 19:33
    
Sorry, was in meetings, code sample provided, although I doubt you're going to enjoy it –  Igorek Aug 28 '13 at 20:43
    
No problem, your approach didn't work either because CustomEntity inherits from TableEntity. So it won't serialize CustomEntity as a byte array. –  Yustme Aug 30 '13 at 21:59

Either delegate the "uninteresting" methods (a more realistic example is here):

class YourClass : Interface {
    public void ReadEntity()
    {
       delegateTo.ReadEntity();
    }
    TableEntity delegateTo = new TableEntity();
}

or just throw an exception inside them (like NotImplementedException) - the latter will only work for you if those methods are not called.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, this was my first approach, the problem with this approach is that the azure table is only filled with the standard properties like partitionKey, rowKey and DateTimeStamp. My own properties are not being saved in the table. If i just use the TableEntity it works. So it's not my own properties where the 'error' lies in. –  Yustme Aug 28 '13 at 12:53
    
Can you post your code for the class? –  Igorek Aug 28 '13 at 13:20
    
Sure, I have updated my question. –  Yustme Aug 28 '13 at 13:25

You can create a class that contains the implementation of the TableEntity class, but also adds the functionality that you want. This is similar to the Decorator Pattern.

[Attributes...]
public class MyTableEntity : ITableEntity {
  private TableEntity decoratedTableEntity;

  public void ReadEntity(args...) {
    decoratedTableEntity.ReadEntity(args...);
  }

}

To make the solution more generic, change decoratedTableEntity to be an ITableEntity.

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Hi, well the same goes for this approach as what I said to sharptooth. –  Yustme Aug 28 '13 at 12:55
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I ended up creating exact copy of these classes and made them Serializable. But being able to do some complex queries seems to be a challenge as well. So we moved to SQL Database.

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