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As I go through the differences between Singleton Vs Static class, I came across one point that we can inherit an interface in singleton class and can call singleton through interface for multiple implementation.

I would like some code demonstration with good example, how object orientation can achieve through singleton and not through static.

Thanks,

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Can you post some example in "pseudocode" ? –  Martin Perry Aug 28 '13 at 12:55
    
what you already tried? –  One Man Crew Aug 28 '13 at 12:55
    
how about searching for one in google or try to create one yourself –  No Idea For Name Aug 28 '13 at 12:55
    
interfaces cant have statics, therefor you cant implement an interface in a static class, why exactly do you need an example? also a static class would use ram even if unused, while singleton will only use ram if actually called –  x4rf41 Aug 28 '13 at 12:56
    

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Although it's hard to tell what exactly you are referring to, one pattern you might be referring to is the Multiton pattern, where you manage a map of named instances as key-value pairs.

That's basically a factory, but each instance is only created once:

I've modified the Wikipedia example a bit to show that you can even derive from a singleton class, as long as your concrete implementations are private and within the original class:

class FooMultiton
{
    private static readonly Dictionary<object, FooMultiton> _instances =
        new Dictionary<object, FooMultiton>();

    // this is the classic good old singleton trick (prevent direct instantiation)
    private FooMultiton()
    { }

    // you can also have private concrete implementations, 
    // invisible to the outside world
    private class ConcreteFooMultitonOne : FooMultiton
    { }

    public static FooMultiton GetInstance(object key)
    {
        lock (_instances) 
        {   
            FooMultiton instance;

            // if it doesn't exist, create it and store it
            if (!_instances.TryGetValue(key, out instance))
            {
                // at this point, you can create a derived class instance
                instance = new ConcreteFooMultitonOne();
                _instances.Add(key, instance);
            }

            // always return the same ("singleton") instance for this key
            return instance;
        }
    }
}

Also, generally, if a singleton is not a static class, it can implement any interface you want. The only thing that a singleton pattern prevents is instantiation of multiple instances of a singleton class, but that doesn't mean you cannot completely replace the implementation with something else.

For example, if you have a singleton which is not a static class:

interface ICanTalk
{
    string Talk();
}

class Singleton : ICanTalk
{
    private Singleton() { }

    private readonly Singleton _instance = new Singleton();
    public Singleton Instance
    { get { return _instance; } }

    public string Talk()
    { return "this is a singleton"; }
}

You can also have a number of different implementations:

class OtherInstance : ICanTalk
{
    public string Talk()
    { return "this is something else"; }
}

Then you are free to choose any implementation you want, but get only a single instance of the Singleton class:

ICanTalk item;

item = Singleton.Instance;
item = new OtherInstance();
item = new YetAnotherInstance();
share|improve this answer

According to nkr1pr

Every class can implement an interface, and a Singleton is just a "normal" class that makes sure that only one instance of it exists at any point in time apart from the other business logic it may implement. This also means that a Singleton has at least 2 responsibities and this is not good OO design as classes should only have 1 responsibility and make sure they are good at that responsibility, but that is another discussion.

Something like:

public interface MyInterface 
{
}

And

public class MySingleton:MyInterface
{
  private static MyInterface instance = new MySingleton();

  private MySingleton() 
  {
  } 

  public static MyInterface getInstance()
  {
    return instance;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
In C#, a static class cannot implement an interface. –  chris.house.00 Aug 28 '13 at 13:04
    
@chris.house.00 you are wrong!!! try this and you will see –  One Man Crew Aug 28 '13 at 13:09
    
But that's not a static class. Static class = public static class MySingleton {} –  chris.house.00 Aug 28 '13 at 13:13
    
@OneManCrew: Chris was probably referring to your every class can implement an interface statement, which does not hold for static classes. –  Groo Aug 28 '13 at 13:13

I'm not sure what you are asking, but singleton classes can implement interfaces. singleton class does not mean static class, one of the method to create a singleton instance is to make use of static members.

public class MyInterfaceImplementation : IMyInterface
{

    private static MyInterfaceImplementation instance;
    private static readonly object lockObj = new object();

    private MyInterfaceImplementation() { }  //private .ctor

    public static MyInterfaceImplementation Instance
    {
        get
        {
            if (instance == null)
            {
                lock (lockObj)
                {
                    instance = new MyInterfaceImplementation();
                }
            }
            return instance;
        }
    }

    public void MyInterfaceMethod()
    {
        //Implement here
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
You need to do a second if (instance == null) inside the lock to make sure you didn't have two threads arrive at the lock at the same time. Otherwise you might still produce multiple instances of the singleton. –  Enigmativity Aug 29 '13 at 2:22

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