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The idea is to implement "lazy" length function to compare list length to a Int without computing the whole length.

{-# LANGUAGE DeriveFunctor
           , TypeFamilies
           , FlexibleInstances #-}
import Data.Functor.Foldable

type instance Base Int   = Maybe

Now we can have Foldable / Unfoldable

instance Foldable Int where
  project 0 = Nothing
  project x = Just (x-1)

instance Unfoldable Int where
  embed Nothing  = 0
  embed (Just x) = x+1

I want to convert [a] into Base Int Int:

leng :: [a] -> Base Int Int
leng = ana phi where
  phi :: [a] -> Base Int [a]
  phi []    = Nothing
  phi (_:t) = Just t

But this doesn't work. It complains [a] -> Base (Maybe Int) [a] is expected as type of phi. I don't understand why.

If that worked, then I can compare:

gt = curry $ hylo psi phi where
  phi (Just _, Nothing)  = Left True
  phi (Nothing, _)       = Left False
  phi (Just t, Just n)   = Right (t, n)

  psi (Left t)  = t
  psi (Right t) = t

main = print $ (leng [1..]) `gt` (ana project 4)

What's wrong with leng?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The type of ana is (a -> Base t a) -> a -> t. Note that it returns the plain t and not Base t t. So the correct type for leng is

leng :: [a] -> Int
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How dumb of me! type instance Base ([a], Int) = Either Bool, then define Foldable ([a],Int) in a obvious way, then gt = curry $ cata phi where phi (Left t) = t etc.... –  Sassa NF Aug 28 '13 at 15:04

Thanks for pointing out the type is wrong. Getting the type right clarified the thought :)

{-# LANGUAGE DeriveFunctor
           , TypeFamilies
           , FlexibleInstances #-}
import Data.Functor.Foldable

type instance Base ([a], Int) = Either Bool

instance Foldable ([a], Int) where
  project ([], _) = Left False
  project (_, 0) = Left True
  project ((h:t), n) = Right (t, n-1)

longerThan :: [a] -> Int -> Bool
longerThan = curry $ cata $ either id id

main = print $ [1..] `longerThan` 4

Satisfied? Let's extend this to show why I really started all this:

{-# LANGUAGE DeriveFunctor
           , TypeFamilies
           , FlexibleInstances
           , FlexibleContexts
           , UndecidableInstances #-}
import Data.Functor.Foldable

data Zip a b x = Z (Base a (Base b x))
instance (Functor (Base a), Functor (Base b)) => Functor (Zip a b) where
  fmap f (Z a) = Z $ fmap (\x -> fmap f x) a

type instance Base (a, b) = Zip a b

Get the hint? We can recurse both structures at the same time!

instance (Foldable a, Foldable b) => Foldable (a, b) where
  project (a, b) = Z $ fmap (\x -> fmap (\y -> (x,y)) $ project b) $ project a

Demo: introduce Base Int, and check the length of the list is greater than a given Int.

type instance Base Int = Maybe

instance Foldable Int where
  project 0 = Nothing
  project x = Just $ x-1

-- lt and gt are the same;
-- just showing off with the order of arguments, so you can appreciate Zip
lt :: Int -> [a] -> Bool
lt = curry $ cata phi where
  phi (Z Nothing) = True
  phi (Z (Just Nil)) = False
  phi (Z (Just (Cons _ t))) = t

gt :: [a] -> Int -> Bool
gt = curry $ cata phi where
  phi (Z (Cons _ Nothing)) = True
  phi (Z Nil) = False
  phi (Z (Cons _ (Just t))) = t

main = print [[1..] `gt` 4, 4 `lt` [1..]]
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Notice that this works for non-negative integers. –  nickie Aug 28 '13 at 16:02
    
Yes, I wanted to use Nat, but we don't have that, do we? –  Sassa NF Aug 28 '13 at 16:12

This may defeat the purpose of the exercise of doing it with type families, but if you simply want a 'lazily compare list length with int'-function you can just write it directly:

cmp :: [a] -> Int -> Ordering
cmp [] n = compare 0 n
cmp (_:xs) n = if n <= 0 then GT else cmp xs (n - 1)
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The same function that @PaulVisschers is implementing, which is indeed one of the simplest ways to do what you want, can be implemented with a catamorphism, if for some reason you want an exercise with Foldables.

import Data.Functor.Foldable

cmp :: [a] -> Int -> Ordering
cmp = cata psi

psi :: Base [a] (Int -> Ordering) -> Int -> Ordering
psi Nil n = compare 0 n
psi (Cons h t) n = if n <= 0 then GT else t (n-1)
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I feel that using high-order functions somehow defeat the purpose of the exercise which is understanding what kind of morphism lazy length is. What you do with t seems like simulating an anamorphism with a catamorphism to me. –  nponeccop Aug 29 '13 at 14:07
    
No offense, I'm not the catamorphic (or anamorphic) type... :-) I'd definitely prefer Paul's simpler code. The only possible usefulness of my suggestion (if we disregard exercises in category theory) is that it is precisely what you would need if you wanted a (higher-order) solution using fold. Then, this t would be your accumulator. –  nickie Aug 29 '13 at 14:18
    
No offense, but Paul's code is too complex for just this purpose. Here I would be better off with cmp xs n = (`compare` n) $ length $ take (n+1) xs - the eagerness of length is a necessity, and the laziness of take is sufficient. The point of the exercise is to put the label on the recursion scheme. Just like after Java you discover there are more loops than just for and while, there is time when you discover there are more fundamental looping and recursion schemes than those in Data.List –  Sassa NF Aug 29 '13 at 15:42

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