Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am writing a class that is going to implement an interface - The interface has 1 method defined in it. When I write my class definition and write implements interfaceService after the class declaration and end my definition and close the brackets of the class WITHOUT overriding the interface method.. It compiles just fine. There is no compilation error and I am able to save the implementing class in Eclipse. Why so? Shouldn't the implementing class be forced to override the method? Here is the interface and implementing class definitions:

Interface:

public interface interfaceService{
    List<Map<String, Object>> doSearch(SearchVo formVo,String indexName,String type)
            throws SearchException;
    long getTotalHitCount();
}

Class:

public abstract class ClientFlagSearch implements SearchService{

}

I have a feeling this has to do with defining the implementing class as abstract. Why?

share|improve this question
    
Any class that extends your abstract class, will have to implement the interface methods –  Cruncher Aug 28 '13 at 13:56

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Shouldn't the implementing class be forced to override the method?

No, an abstract class does not have to implement every method of the interface. Those methods that you choose to not implement remain abstract and have to be implemented further down the inheritance tree.

If ClientFlagSearch were not abstract, it would indeed have to implement every method of SearchService.

share|improve this answer

The rule is abstract method MUST BE implemented in the first concrete class

  • An abstract class doesn't have to implement abstract methods
  • abstract classes can have abstract methods.
share|improve this answer
1  
should be not!, MUST BE –  nachokk Aug 28 '13 at 14:04
    
@nachokk aye aye sir. –  Prasad Kharkar Aug 28 '13 at 14:15

Interface is a collection of abstract methods.

Abstract class can have abstract methods.

You don't need to implement the interface's methods in your Abstract class, though you can.

share|improve this answer

From http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/IandI/abstract.html:

It is possible, however, to define a class that does not implement all of the interface methods, provided that the class is declared to be abstract.

share|improve this answer

Abstract classes do not have to implement anything. This works the same way as it would had you written

public abstract class ClientFlagSearch {
    List<Map<String, Object>> doSearch(SearchVo formVo,String indexName,String type)
            throws SearchException;
    long getTotalHitCount();
}
share|improve this answer
    
everything -> anything –  eis Aug 28 '13 at 13:57
    
Well, yeah. Changed it. –  Mattsjo Aug 28 '13 at 13:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.