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I have this weird case when I have to manage a few small texts depending on page language using javascript. Just imagine you need to replace some parts of the template depending on html lang attribute. So I created multidimensional data object and decided to go with the following way around it. Everything works fine but I feel like it is not the best practice and maybe I could avoid using switch:

jsbin version: http://jsbin.com/EvEciVa/2/

$(function(){

var lang = $('html').attr('lang'),
    text;

var obj = {
  'en' : {
    'title' : 'Title english',
    'url' : 'en.html'   
  },
  'fr' : {
    'title' : 'Title french',
    'url' : 'fr.html',   
  }               
};

switch(lang){               
  case'fr':
  text = [obj.fr.title,obj.fr.url];
  break;               
  default:
  text = [obj.en.title,obj.en.url];
}

  $('body').prepend('<a href="'+text[1]+'">'+text[0]+'</a>');

});

The question is: As far as I have the lang attribute value (the language), maybe I could avoid using switch and duplicate cases, instead I could implement the lang value as variable to access data object, something like this [obj.lang.title,obj.lang.url]; Of course it wont work in my case.

I would appreciate any opinion. Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
thank you very much –  devjs11 Aug 28 '13 at 16:34

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

To avoid having the switch statement, you can set a default value like this:

var lang = $('html').attr('lang') || 'en';

This means that en is the default, to be overridden if there is a lang set. You can then use bracket notation to access the object like this:

$('body').prepend('<a href="' + obj[lang].url + '">' + obj[lang].title + '</a>');
share|improve this answer
1  
Thank you Rory, although I cant get it work with default en. For example if I change lang="fr" to lang that does not exist like lang="dfgdfg" It wont take en text. Just undefined. –  devjs11 Aug 28 '13 at 14:49
    
@devjs11 that's odd. Try using var lang = $('html').prop('lang') || 'en'; instead. –  Rory McCrossan Aug 28 '13 at 14:50
    
Look, just made an example for you jsbin.com/EvEciVa/3 –  devjs11 Aug 28 '13 at 14:53
    
Ok, it works only if lang attribute is omitted but it wont work if the value of lang tag does not exist in data object. Can this be solved? thank you. –  devjs11 Aug 28 '13 at 15:44
    
Fixed it with the following code instead if(obj[lang] === undefined){lang = 'en';} –  devjs11 Aug 28 '13 at 16:01

You don't really need an array in this case:

$('body').prepend('<a href="'+obj[lang].url+'">'+obj[lang].title+'</a>');
share|improve this answer

Use bracket notation

text = [obj[lang].title,obj[lang].url];

I would drop the array, and just put the title/url in the string.

var data = obj[lang];
$('body').prepend('<a href="' + data.url + '">' + data.text + '</a>');
share|improve this answer

I would assign the localized object to another variable and work from there. This way, all the localization code can reference the same object without having to deal with handling the language logic and at a later date you can switch to external localization files, should you need to.

$(function(){

  var lang = $('html').attr('lang') || 'en',
        text;


  var obj = {
    'en' : {
      'title' : 'Title english',
      'url' : 'en.html'   
    },
    'fr' : {
      'title' : 'Title french',
      'url' : 'fr.html',   
    }               
  };


  var translations = obj[lang];


  $('body').prepend('<a href="'+translations.url+'">'+translations.text+'</a>');

});

And also, as Rory mentioned, setting a default value is a very good idea.

share|improve this answer

To avoid the switch statement you can just check whether the attributed language is apparent in your object, and else choose english:

var lang = $('html').attr('lang');
if (! (lang in obj))
    lang = "en";

// then:
'<a href="' + obj[lang].url + '">' + obj[lang].title + '</a>'

Or, maybe easier, use the shorter

var localisation = obj[ $('html').attr('lang') ] || obj.en;

'<a href="' + localisation.url + '">' + localisation.title + '</a>'
share|improve this answer
    
@downvoter, please explain. –  Bergi Aug 28 '13 at 17:00

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