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I've created the following program to try and help me understand asynchronous calls / callbacks in node.js but instead ended up with more questions.

var z = 0

// define our function with the callback argument
function some_function(arg1, arg2, callback) {
    // this generates a random number between
    // arg1 and arg2
    var my_number = Math.ceil(Math.random() *
        (arg1 - arg2) + arg2);
    // then we're done, so we'll call the callback and
    // pass our result
    callback(my_number);
}

// call the function - callback 1
some_function(5, 15, function(num) {
    // this anonymous function will run when the
    // callback is called
        z = 1;
        console.log("callback 1 called! " + num + " z= " + z);
});

// call the function - callback 2
some_function(20, 25, function(num) {
    // this anonymous function will run when the
    // callback is called
    var x=3000;
    z = 2;
    setTimeout(function() {
        console.log("callback 2 called! " + num + "-> but waited " + x + " z= " + z);
        }
    ,x);
});

// call the function - callback 3
some_function(30, 35, function(num) {
    // this anonymous function will run when the
    // callback is called
    var x=5000;
    z = 3;
    setTimeout(console.log("callback 3 called! " + num + "-> but waited " + x + " z= " + z), x);
});

//callback function for callback 4
function callback_function(my_num) {
    z = 4;
    console.log("callback 4 called! " +  "-> but waited " + " z= " + z);
}

// call the function - callback 4
some_function(40, 45, function(num) {
    // this anonymous function will run when the
    // callback is called
    var x=6000;
    setTimeout(callback_function, x);
});

And here is the output I get:

node callback_test.js 
callback 1 called! 13 z= 1
callback 3 called! 35-> but waited 5000 z= 3
callback 4 called! -> but waited  z= 4
callback 2 called! 25-> but waited 3000 z= 4

My questions are:

  1. From what I understand is that callback-3 executes the console.log statement within the setTimeout immediately as opposed to the callback-2 which only executes it when the setTimeout completes - Is that correct? And to help me understand, why does it?

  2. In callback-4, I created another callback function for the setTimeout statement. That function (callback_function) has a parameter my_num. If I run it as it appears above, it then acts as a callback but when I run it like this setTimeout(callback_function(num), x); then it executes it immediately - Why does this happen?

  3. This relates to question 2. From the setTimeout(callback_function, x); in callback-4, how can I pass-in in an argument to the callback_function like it has been defined in the function callback_function(my_num) {... ?

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To better understand node.js, why aren't use using process.nextTick instead of setTimeout? –  Josh C. Aug 28 '13 at 16:15
1  
Callback functions are kinda like when a girl leaves her earrings over your house on purpose, then she calls and says she is just going to swing by and pick them up but stays until you call her out on it. I am new but I think you are way off in Q#1. You define that function, it sees it is being called then runs back and generates a random number until it hits callback(my_number) then does callback 1. Sees callback 2, gets a random number, then hits up callback 2 when it sees the callback(my_number) and so on. –  Four_lo Aug 28 '13 at 16:22
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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

From what I understand is that callback-3 executes the console.log statement within the setTimeout immediately as opposed to the callback-2 which only executes it when the setTimeout completes - Is that correct? And to help me understand, why does it?

This is just a bug. You will never see real code like this. It only even executes because JavaScript is extremely lax about types.

setTimeout(console.log("callback 3 called! " + num + "-> but waited " + x + " z= " + z), x);

The console.log statement executes immediately and evaluates to undefined, so this is equivalent to calling setTimeout(undefined) and since setTimeout expects a function and optional delay as its arguments, it doesn't do anything. It would probably be saner for setTimeout to throw an exception here but in this case JavaScript just continues on and ignores the non-function argument.


In callback-4, I created another callback function for the setTimeout statement. That function (callback_function) has a parameter my_num. If I run it as it appears above, it then acts as a callback but when I run it like this setTimeout(callback_function(num), x); then it executes it immediately - Why does this happen?

Because there's a difference between providing a reference to a function object and invoking a function. In this case you are invoking the function when you really just need to provide a reference to it. This confusion can be brought to the foreground in asynchronous JS, but really it's a basic JS language level thing that you need to just spend some time thinking about until you have 100% clarity on this point.


This relates to question 2. From the setTimeout(callback_function, x); in callback-4, how can I pass-in in an argument to the callback_function like it has been defined in the function callback_function(my_num) {... ?

Either use a wrapper function:

setTimeout(function () {callback_function(num)})

or use Function.bind

setTimeout(callback_function.bind(null, num))

(this is called currying). Both options above are achieving almost exactly the same thing. Function.bind is just a convenience syntax for it.

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