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I have a very large collection of documents like:

{ loc: [10.32, 24.34], relevance: 0.434 }

and want to be able efficiently do a query like:

 { "loc": {"$geoWithin":{"$box":[[-103,10.1],[-80.43,30.232]]}} }

with arbitrary boxes.

Adding an 2d index on loc makes this very fast and efficient. However, I want to now also just get the most relevant documents:

.sort({ relevance: -1 })

Which causes everything to grind to a crawl (there can be huge amount of results in any particular box, and I just need the top 10 or so).

Any advise or help greatly appreciated!!

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Did you try including relevance as the "additional field" when creating the 2d index? –  JohnnyHK Aug 28 '13 at 17:02
    
Yeah, doesn't help –  Heptic Aug 28 '13 at 17:48

3 Answers 3

Have you tried using the aggregation framework?

A two stage pipeline might work:

  1. a $match stage that uses your existing $geoWithin query.
  2. a $sort stage that sorts by relevance: -1

Here's an example of what it might look like:

db.foo.aggregate(
    {$match: { "loc": {"$geoWithin":{"$box":[[-103,10.1],[-80.43,30.232]]}} }},
    {$sort: {relevance: -1}}
);

I'm not sure how it will perform. However, even if it's poor with MongoDB 2.4, it might be dramatically different in 2.6/2.5, as 2.6 will include improved aggregation sort performance.

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Thanks for showing an example with $geoWithin in an aggregate() function. This is the only example I could find. I notices that when using a $sort there is no difference in speed between using a aggregate() and a find() function. But if the sort is not included, the find() performs much faster than the $aggregate. I was using MongoDB version 2.4.9. Good info on 2.6. When mongoLabs upgrades I will try it out. –  BarDev Jul 7 at 1:54

When there is a huge result matching particular box, sort operation is really expensive so that you definitely want to avoid it. Try creating separate index on relevance field and try using it (without 2d index at all): the query will be executed much more efficiently that way - documents (already sorted by relevance) will be scanned one by one matching the given geo box condition. When top 10 are found, you're good.

It might not be that fast if geo box matches only small subset of the collection, though. In worst case scenario it will need to scan through the whole collection.

I suggest you to create 2 indexes (loc vs. relevance) and run tests on queries which are common in your app (using mongo's hint to force using needed index).

Depending on your tests results, you may even want to add some app logic so that if you know the box is huge you can run the query with relevance index, otherwise use loc 2d index. Just a thought.

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Thanks, both type of queries are extremely common -- and it's not really possible/feasible to know if the region is going to have a huge amount of documents or a small amount of documents in it. –  Heptic Sep 2 '13 at 21:43
1  
One thing I wonder, is if I can fire two queries off simultaneously (each using the different index), and as soon as one returns -- terminate the other? –  Heptic Sep 2 '13 at 21:44
    
I am unaware of any possibility for you to fire a query from client and get its operation id so that you can call killOp on it. Even if it would exist I suppose what you will get is double load on your mongo instance, since while you're fetching results from winning query, getting loosing query's op id, sending request to kill it, it will already eat up computational resources + cpu still needed for those managing queries themselves. –  max_i Sep 2 '13 at 22:00

You cannot have the scan and order value as 0 when you trying to use to have sorting on the part of a compound key. Unfortunately currently there is no solution for your problem which is not related to the phenomenon that you are using a 2d index or else.

When you run an explain command on your query the value of "scanAndOrder" show weather it was needed to have a sorting phase after collecting the result or not.If it is true a sorting after the querying was needed, if it is false sorting was not needed.

To test the situation i created a collection called t2 in a sample db this way:

db.createCollection('t2')
db.t2.ensureIndex({a:1})
db.t2.ensureIndex({b:1})
db.t2.ensureIndex({a:1,b:1})
db.t2.ensureIndex({b:1,a:1})

for(var i=0;i++<200;){db.t2.insert({a:i,b:i+2})}

While you can use only 1 index to support a query i did the following test with the results included:

mongos> db.t2.find({a:{$gt:50}}).sort({b:1}).hint("b_1").explain()
{
    "cursor" : "BtreeCursor b_1",
    "isMultiKey" : false,
    "n" : 150,
    "nscannedObjects" : 200,
    "nscanned" : 200,
    "nscannedObjectsAllPlans" : 200,
    "nscannedAllPlans" : 200,
    "scanAndOrder" : false,
    "indexOnly" : false,
    "nYields" : 0,
    "nChunkSkips" : 0,
    "millis" : 0,
    "indexBounds" : {
        "b" : [
            [
                {
                    "$minElement" : 1
                },
                {
                    "$maxElement" : 1
                }
            ]
        ]
    },
    "server" : "localhost:27418",
    "millis" : 0
}
mongos> db.t2.find({a:{$gt:50}}).sort({b:1}).hint("a_1_b_1").explain()
{
    "cursor" : "BtreeCursor a_1_b_1",
    "isMultiKey" : false,
    "n" : 150,
    "nscannedObjects" : 150,
    "nscanned" : 150,
    "nscannedObjectsAllPlans" : 150,
    "nscannedAllPlans" : 150,
    "scanAndOrder" : true,
    "indexOnly" : false,
    "nYields" : 0,
    "nChunkSkips" : 0,
    "millis" : 1,
    "indexBounds" : {
        "a" : [
            [
                50,
                1.7976931348623157e+308
            ]
        ],
        "b" : [
            [
                {
                    "$minElement" : 1
                },
                {
                    "$maxElement" : 1
                }
            ]
        ]
    },
    "server" : "localhost:27418",
    "millis" : 1
}
mongos> db.t2.find({a:{$gt:50}}).sort({b:1}).hint("a_1").explain()
{
    "cursor" : "BtreeCursor a_1",
    "isMultiKey" : false,
    "n" : 150,
    "nscannedObjects" : 150,
    "nscanned" : 150,
    "nscannedObjectsAllPlans" : 150,
    "nscannedAllPlans" : 150,
    "scanAndOrder" : true,
    "indexOnly" : false,
    "nYields" : 0,
    "nChunkSkips" : 0,
    "millis" : 1,
    "indexBounds" : {
        "a" : [
            [
                50,
                1.7976931348623157e+308
            ]
        ]
    },
    "server" : "localhost:27418",
    "millis" : 1
}


 mongos> db.t2.find({a:{$gt:50}}).sort({b:1}).hint("b_1_a_1").explain()
{
    "cursor" : "BtreeCursor b_1_a_1",
    "isMultiKey" : false,
    "n" : 150,
    "nscannedObjects" : 150,
    "nscanned" : 198,
    "nscannedObjectsAllPlans" : 150,
    "nscannedAllPlans" : 198,
    "scanAndOrder" : false,
    "indexOnly" : false,
    "nYields" : 0,
    "nChunkSkips" : 0,
    "millis" : 0,
    "indexBounds" : {
        "b" : [
            [
                {
                    "$minElement" : 1
                },
                {
                    "$maxElement" : 1
                }
            ]
        ],
        "a" : [
            [
                50,
                1.7976931348623157e+308
            ]
        ]
    },
    "server" : "localhost:27418",
    "millis" : 0
}

The indexes on individual fields does not help much so a_1 (not support sorting) and b_1 (not support queryin) is out . The index on a_1_b_1 also not fortunate while it will perform worse than the single a_1, mongoDB engine will not utilize the situation that the part related to one 'a' value stored ordered this way. What is worth to try is a compound index b_1_a_1 which in your case relevance_1_loc_1 while it will return the results in ordered manner so scanAndOrder will be false and i have not tested for 2d index but i assume it will exclude scanning some documents based on just the index value (that is why in the test in that case the nscanned is higher than nscannedObjects). The index unfortunately will be huge but still smaller than the docs.

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