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Let's say I have an opened filehandle, or anything I have to fix before to exit the script. I also have a long loop and I want to break the loop if the processus receives a sigint. What is the cleanest way to do this?

Here is an illustration of the problem ;

use sigtrap 'handler' => \&sigint_handler, 'INT';

sub sigint_handler {
  print("\nI see you are trying to escape this evil infinite loop,
but there is nothing that I can do to help you :(\n");
}

my $the_developper_is_unable_to_end_this_mess = 1;

open(my $handle, "< some.important.file");

while($the_developper_is_unable_to_end_this_mess) {
  print("And the evil loop rolls again and again...\n");
  sleep(3);
}

close($handle);

print("everything went better than expected\n")
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Cleanup code that should absolutely be run can be put into an END block:

END {
  print "This is run before the program exits\n";
}
print "This is some normal code\n";

Output:

This is some normal code
This is run before the program exits

However, END blocks are not run when the process terminates from a signal, unless when you implement your own signal handler – and if all that it does is calling exit.

So this code won't print END when you terminate it with a SIGINT:

END { print "END\n" }
sleep 4;

But this one will:

END { print "END\n" }
local $SIG{INT} = sub { exit 1 };
sleep 4;

These handlers are dynamically scoped, so you can put one into the loop that isn't in effect on the outside:

 my $run = 1;
 while ($run) {
   local $SIG{INT} = sub { $run = 0 };
   print "zzz\n";
   sleep 3;
 }
 print "done!\n";

Of course you can also use sigtrap:

 my $run = 1;
 while ($run) {
   use sigtrap handler => sub { $run = 0 }, 'INT';
   print "zzz\n";
   sleep 3;
 }
 print "done!\n";

PS: Filehandles are automatically closed when they fall out of scope / on process exit. If the handle is just reading from a file, there can't be any buffering issues or other processes depending on the handle, so that you can safely forget about close $fh in this case.

share|improve this answer
    
@derpness Thanks for the suggested edit. Setting the handlers every loop is indeed unneeded, but I wanted to place it inside the block for scoping purposes. A better solution would have been to { my $run = 1; use sigtrap ...; while ($run) { ... } }. Anyway, this is really tangential to the main purpose of the code, so your suggestion was not incorporated. –  amon Apr 25 at 19:29

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