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Using the same code from a previous question, this sample generates the graph below:

import matplotlib
matplotlib.use('Agg')
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

data = (0, 1890,865, 236, 6, 1, 2, 0 , 0, 0, 0 ,0 ,0 ,0, 0, 0)
ind = range(len(data))
width = 0.9   # the width of the bars: can also be len(x) sequence

p1 = plt.bar(ind, data, width)
plt.xlabel('Duration 2^x')
plt.ylabel('Count')
plt.title('DBFSwrite')
plt.axis([0, len(data), -1, max(data)])

ax = plt.gca()

ax.spines['right'].set_visible(False)
ax.spines['top'].set_visible(False)
ax.spines['left'].set_visible(False)
ax.spines['bottom'].set_visible(False)

plt.savefig('myfig')

Sample output

Instead of the tick labels being 0, 2, 4, 6, 8...I would rather have them be labeled at every mark, and proceed with the value of 2^x: 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, etc. How can I do that? And then even better, could I have the label centered under the bar, instead of at the left edge?

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up vote 5 down vote accepted

One way of achieving this is to make use of a Locator and a Formatter. This makes it possible to use the plot interactively without "losing" tickmarks. In this case I'd recommend MultipleLocator and FuncFormatter as seen in example below.

import matplotlib
matplotlib.use('Agg')
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from matplotlib.ticker import MultipleLocator, FuncFormatter

data = (0, 1890,865, 236, 6, 1, 2, 0 , 0, 0, 0 ,0 ,0 ,0, 0, 0)
ind = range(len(data))
width = 0.9   # the width of the bars: can also be len(x) sequence

# Add `aling='center'` to center bars on ticks
p1 = plt.bar(ind, data, width, align='center')
plt.xlabel('Duration 2^x')
plt.ylabel('Count')
plt.title('DBFSwrite')
plt.axis([0, len(data), -1, max(data)])

ax = plt.gca()

# Place tickmarks at every multiple of 1, i.e. at any integer
ax.xaxis.set_major_locator(MultipleLocator(1))
# Format the ticklabel to be 2 raised to the power of `x`
ax.xaxis.set_major_formatter(FuncFormatter(lambda x, pos: int(2**x)))
# Make the axis labels rotated for easier reading
plt.gcf().autofmt_xdate()

ax.spines['right'].set_visible(False)
ax.spines['top'].set_visible(False)
ax.spines['left'].set_visible(False)
ax.spines['bottom'].set_visible(False)

plt.savefig('myfig')

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for a solution that doesn't rely on pyplot – Phillip Cloud Aug 29 '13 at 1:54
    
@PhillipCloud I don't understand your comment. – tcaswell Aug 29 '13 at 4:12
    
@tcaswell My mistake. I thought that FuncFormatter and MultipleLocator were not part of pyplot, turns out they are imported with pyplot. – Phillip Cloud Aug 29 '13 at 12:48
    
pyplot is just a bucket for bulk importing matplotlib related stuff. – tcaswell Aug 29 '13 at 15:16
    
That is simpler, thanks! – monty0 Aug 29 '13 at 20:46

xticks() is what you want:

# return locs, labels where locs is an array of tick locations and
# labels is an array of tick labels.
locs, labels = xticks()

# set the locations of the xticks
xticks( arange(6) )

# set the locations and labels of the xticks
xticks( arange(5), ('Tom', 'Dick', 'Harry', 'Sally', 'Sue') )

So, to have the ticks at 2^x for x in 1..4, do as follows:

tick_values = [2**x for x in arange(1,5)]

xticks(tick_values,[("%.0f" % x)  for x in tick_values])

To have the labels centered instead of left of the bars, use the align='center' when calling bar.

Here's the result:

the resulting graph

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2  
+1 On a side note, there's no need to do [2**x for x in arange(1,5)] It's much more efficient to just do 2**arange(1, 5). – Joe Kington Aug 28 '13 at 19:23
    
oh yeah, thanks for pointing this out! It's just that I'm in love with list comprehensions so I use them whenever I can ;) – ThePhysicist Aug 28 '13 at 19:25
    
Yes, but you should be more in love with numpy ;) – tcaswell Aug 29 '13 at 4:11

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