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I have following class which I am trying to instantiate through spring.

class MyBean{

    MyBean myBeanFallback;
    MyDataObject myDataObject;

    public void setMyBeanFallback(MyBean myBeanFallback){
        this.myBeanFallback = myBeanFallback;
    }

    MyBean(MyDataObject myDataObject){
        this.myDataObject = myDataObject;
    }

}

Following is the spring config I am tryin got use to load this :

<bean name="myNewBean" class="MyBean"
    scope="prototype">
    <constructor-arg index="0"  type="MyDataObject" >
        <null />
    </constructor-arg>
    <property name="myBeanFallback" ref="myOldBean" />
</bean>

<bean name="myOldBean" class="MyBean"
    scope="prototype">
    <constructor-arg index="0"  type="MyDataObject" >
        <null />
    </constructor-arg>
</bean>

In my application code, I may instantiate the myOldBean which has data and no fallback. else I may instantiate the myNewBean which has data and also has myOldBean as fallback, which in turn also needs to have same myDataObject

getNewBean(MyData mydata){
 return (MyBean) context.getBean("myNewBean", new Object[] { mydata });
}


getOldBean(MyData mydata){
 return (MyBean) context.getBean("myOldBean", new Object[] { mydata });
}

The problem I am facing now is that while getting myNewBean, the fallback getNewBean doesn't get populated with mydata, rather takes null.

Any pointers on how this can be fixed ?

share|improve this question
    
So the question that I have on this is what is the point of the Spring config here? What is it that you are trying to allow to be customized through Spring config? (Pls see conversation below between bellabax and I.) Do you want to be able to override the implementation of MyBean by providing a different class for that? –  bgp Aug 28 '13 at 21:12
    
May be yes. Also I wanted to do all construction from me, inject with right dependencies and populate the desired parameters. MyData is the data object, I've multiple other dependencies to be injected in myBean as well which also I want to achieve through spring –  Archit Jain Aug 29 '13 at 3:24

3 Answers 3

You can't do that with Spring; when you get myNewBean, myBeanFallback (myOldBean) property is correctly instatiated with null value as specified in constructor and you can't change this behaviour because myBeanFallback is not constructed using FactoryBean.getBean() but autowired.
Maybe using a factory in this way can be a solution:

class MyBeanFactory {
  public getNewBean(MyData mydata){
    MyBean myBean = (MyBean) context.getBean("myNewBean", new Object[] { mydata });
    MyBean myBeanFallback = getOldBean(myData);
    myBean.setMyBeanFallback(myBeanFallback);
    return myBean;
  }


  public getOldBean(MyData mydata){
     return (MyBean) context.getBean("myOldBean", new Object[] { mydata });
  }
}

and beans.xml

<bean name="myNewBean" class="MyBean" scope="prototype" />
<bean name="myOldBean" class="MyBean" scope="prototype" />
share|improve this answer

Never done this kind of things but here are my $.05: because your myOldBean definition is scoped as prototype, internally in Spring it is known with that name but it is null. Hence when you create a myNewBean instance it will use that null reference.

I don't think that Spring was intended to be used that way. I might be wrong but the whole constructor passing values to getBean is bypass one of the goals of Spring: let spring configure and link your objects like you specify in the xml file, mixing the xml with creating beans in code will result in a mess like your case...

So my advice would be: try to put the whole configuration in spring.

share|improve this answer
    
How can I do this here ? Can you help with sample bean xml ? –  Archit Jain Aug 28 '13 at 19:57
    
He want to create myOldBean bean (as myBeanFallback property) with the same mydata arg passed to getNewBean(MyData). OP wants mydata arg propagated to myOldBean contextually to creation of myNewBean –  Luca Basso Ricci Aug 28 '13 at 20:07

@bellabax has the right idea.

The other point on this is that you can use a FactoryBean (link to Spring manual) to customize the construction of a bean that is scope=prototype. So you can leave myOldBean as it is and then customize the construction of myNewBean by doing something like this:

<bean name="myNewBean" class="MyNewFactoryBean" scope="prototype">
    <property name="myData"><!-- however you want to provide the value for this --></property>
</bean>

And then the FactoryBean implementation:

public class MyNewFactoryBean implements FactoryBean<MyBean> {

    protected MyData myData;

    public void setMyData(MyData d) {
        myData = d;
    }

    @Override
    public MyBean getObject() throws Exception {
        MyBean myBean = new MyBean();
        myBean.setMyBeanFallback(context.getBean("myOldBean", new Object[] { myData }));
        return myBean;
    }

    @Override
    public Class<MyBean> getObjectType() {
        return MyBean.class;
    }
    .... 
}

When you do it like that, you can (later in your code) do something like context.getBean("myNewBean") just as you normally would and it will invoke your custom instantiation logic from MyNewFactoryBean.

share|improve this answer
    
Yust a question: why don't use the same factory to set myBean.setMyBeanFallback()? It's a MyBean as myBean... but, beside that, I thought about factorybean but MyNewFactoryBean.myData should be provided from application code. You have to write MyNewFactoryBean fb = context.getBean("myNewBean"); fb.setMyData(mydata); and you lost the real way to use autowiring... the question himself use spring injection capabilities in a weird way –  Luca Basso Ricci Aug 28 '13 at 21:04
1  
@bellabax Interesting - yes, you're right, in the question itself he's using a combination of configuration provided from Spring but then also passing in myData. I agree that he's going to need to decide where the config data is supposed to come from. If the constructor arg is being passed in from the code, then much of the benefit of the spring wiring is lost. However, if he's trying to customize the construction process, a FactoryBean is the right tool. I'll see if I can revise my answer here to lay it out in more detail. –  bgp Aug 28 '13 at 21:10
    
IMHO a FactoryBean should be used directly in xml autowiring parameters and use in behalf of prototype bean ref; every use with context.getBean() is a innatural use. Due to that (personal) considerations in my application I resolved the question as posted in my answer with a MyBeanFactory interface and relative implementation without FactoryBean because I had the same problem as OP because args came from application code. –  Luca Basso Ricci Aug 28 '13 at 21:23
    
Yeah, I get what you mean. The other point is that if you can implement MyBean(MyDataObject d) as MyBean b = new MyBean(); b.setMyDataObject(...), the you could actually use spring wiring to decide the classes involved and do the construction (using a FactoryBean), and then still set your MyDataObject afterward. That would probably be the best way to divide that up. –  bgp Aug 28 '13 at 22:20

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