Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I had this idea this morning on avoiding nested try finally blocks like the following

procedure DoSomething;
var
  T1, T2, T3 : TTestObject;
begin
  T1 := TTestObject.Create('One');
  try
    T2 := TTestObject.Create('Two');
    try
      T3 := TTestObject.Create('Three');
      try
        //A bunch of code;
      finally
        T3.Free;
      end;
    finally
      T2.Free;
    end;
  finally
    T1.Free;
  end;
end;

By taking advantage of the automated reference counting of interfaces, I have come up with

Type  
  IDoFinally = interface
    procedure DoFree(O : TObject);
  end;

  TDoFinally = class(TInterfacedObject, IDoFinally)
  private
    FreeObjectList : TObjectList;
  public
    procedure DoFree(O : TObject);
    constructor Create;
    destructor Destroy; override;
  end;

//...

procedure TDoFinally.DoFree(O : TObject);
begin
  FreeObjectList.Add(O);
end;

constructor TDoFinally.Create;
begin
  FreeObjectList := TObjectList.Create(True);
end;

destructor TDoFinally.Destroy;
begin
  FreeObjectList.Free;
  inherited;
end;

So that the previous block of code becomes

procedure DoSomething;
var
  T1, T2, T3 : TTestObject;
  DoFinally : IDoFinally;
begin
  DoFinally := TDoFinally.Create;
  T1 := TTestObject.Create('One');
  DoFinally.DoFree(T1);
  T2 := TTestObject.Create('Two');
  DoFinally.DoFree(T2);
  T3 := TTestObject.Create('Three');
  DoFinally.DoFree(T3);
  // A Bunch of code;
end;

My question is: does this work or have I overlooked something?

To me this looks pretty cool, and makes the code a bit easier to read with the reduced amount of nesting. It could also be extended to store a list of anonymous methods to run to do things such as close files, queries, etc...

share|improve this question
6  
I honestly do not like this method. It actually makes the code less readable. Sure, it minimizes the amount of code you have to read, but you're only complicating things. –  Jerry Dodge Aug 28 '13 at 19:58
    
The compiler will put a hidden try-finally block in to ensure that the interface is decremented (and freed). –  Nicholas Ring Aug 28 '13 at 20:36
    
That's correct, @Nicholas. Was that ever in question? –  Rob Kennedy Aug 28 '13 at 20:49
1  
@JerryDodge I think whenever you stray from "standard" Delphi coding practices you can make code harder to understand (for anyone but the author) - even if it is simpler. See Rob Kennedy's answer using the JCL - it is even shorter and cleaner. My goal is more to remove all the extra stuff so that the Business Logic is easy to follow. –  Alister Aug 28 '13 at 20:56
2  
Also don't forget that Add() will raise an exception if there is a problem with memory, so you would have to use a try/except block to ensure untracked objects still get freed. –  Remy Lebeau Aug 28 '13 at 23:37

9 Answers 9

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Yes, it works.

Perhaps the only thing different between the nested try-finally blocks of the original code and the technique of using a reference-counted object to manage the lifetimes of other objects is what happens if there's a problem destroying any of the objects. If there's an exception while any object is being destroyed, the nested try-finally blocks will ensure that any remaining objects will still get freed. The TObjectList in your TDoFinally doesn't do that; if any item in the list can't be destroyed, any subsequent items in the list will be leaked.

In practice, that's not really a problem, though. No destructor should ever throw an exception. If it does, there's not really any way to recover from it anyway, so it doesn't matter if anything leaks because of it. Your program should terminate momentarily anyway, so having a tidy cleanup routine is of little importance.

Incidentally, the JCL already offers the ISafeGuard and IMultiSafeGuard interfaces for managing local objects' lifetimes. For example, you could rewrite your code like this:

uses JclSysUtils;

procedure DoSomething;
var
  T1, T2, T3: TTestObject;
  G: IMultiSafeGuard;
begin
  T1 := TTestObject(Guard(TTestObject.Create('One'), G));
  T2 := TTestObject(Guard(TTestObject.Create('Two'), G));
  T3 := TTestObject(Guard(TTestObject.Create('Three'), G));
  // A Bunch of code;
end;

That library doesn't address exceptions in destructors, either.

share|improve this answer
    
In my continued playing I've changed DoFree to a function returning the TObject - so that the one liner above is possible. –  Alister Aug 28 '13 at 20:47
1  
+1 This answer clearly states the potential issue of the original code which may occur if a destructor raise an exception. –  Arnaud Bouchez Aug 29 '13 at 6:23
    
+1 for "No destructor should ever throw an exception. If it does, there's not really any way to recover from it anyway, so it doesn't matter if anything leaks because of it." –  Jeroen Wiert Pluimers Aug 29 '13 at 8:11

I usually do something like this, as provides a balance between code readability and complexity:

procedure DoSomething;
var
  T1, T2, T3 : TTestObject;
begin
  T1 := nil;
  T2 := nil;
  T3 := nil;
  try
    T1 := TTestObject.Create('One');
    T2 := TTestObject.Create('Two');
    T3 := TTestObject.Create('Three');

    // A bunch of code

  finally
    T3.Free;
    T2.Free;
    T1.Free;
  end;
end;

Warning:

  • This is not completely equivalent to your original code, because if T3.Free throws an exception, T2 and T1 will not get freed and cause a memory leak, and the same for T2.Free in respect of T1.

  • However, as Rob Kennedy points in his comment, and explain in more detail in his answer, it is equivalent to your alternative code using IDoFinally.

  • So your two approaches are not completely equivalent.

share|improve this answer
3  
Yes, I've used this technique. If your destructors are throwing exceptions then you are probably doing something seriously wrong. Infact I cover this technique in a video I made a few years ago- learndelphi.tv/index.php?option=com_content&id=58 –  Alister Aug 28 '13 at 21:02
1  
It's equivalent to the code that uses IDoFinally. It's not equivalent to the code with the nested try-finally blocks. –  Rob Kennedy Aug 28 '13 at 21:07
1  
@Arnaud I can find lots of examples of your code that takes this risk ..... –  David Heffernan Aug 29 '13 at 7:40
2  
@whosrdaddy There's no problem at all. When the scenario you describe occurs, the object reference, e.g. T1, is not assigned. And thus T1.Free is a no-op. –  David Heffernan Aug 29 '13 at 9:43
2  
@ArnaudBouchez For example: TPdfArray.Destroy, TPdfDictionaryElement.Destroy, TPdfDictionary.Destroy, TPdfStream.Destroy, TPdfXref.Destroy and so on. What's more, anytime you override a destructor and the inherited destructor calls Free, then you are in the exact same situation. Your complaint is unjustified. –  David Heffernan Aug 29 '13 at 10:36

Smart pointers are other way to achieve automatic memory management.

The ADUG website has an Delphi implementation derived from Barry Kelly's articles on how to implement strongly-typed smart pointers in Delphi using generics, anonymous methods and interfaces:

  1. Smart pointers in Delphi
  2. Reference-counted pointers, revisited
  3. Somewhat more efficient smart pointers

Your code will be rewritten as this:

procedure DoSomething;
var
  T1, T2, T3 : ISmartPointer<TTestObject>;
begin
  T1 := TSmartPointer<TTestObject>.Create(TTestObject.Create('One'));
  T2 := TSmartPointer<TTestObject>.Create(TTestObject.Create('Two'));
  T3 := TSmartPointer<TTestObject>.Create(TTestObject.Create('Three'));

  // A bunch of code
end;
share|improve this answer
    
+1 this was what immediately popped into my mind, but couldn't find it soon enough. –  Jeroen Wiert Pluimers Aug 29 '13 at 8:14
1  
Yet another reason to upgrade to post-Delphi 2007. I wish I could... –  dummzeuch Aug 29 '13 at 9:32

An alternative I sometimes use:

procedure DoSomething;
var
  T1, T2, T3: TTestObject;
begin
  T1 := nil;
  T2 := nil;
  T3 := nil;
  try
    T1 := TTestObject.Create;
    T2 := TTestObject.Create;
    T3 := TTestObject.Create;
    // ...
  finally
    T1.Free;
    T2.Free;
    T3.Free;
  end;
end;
share|improve this answer
1  
Same code as JR, but with no explication nor warning. As stated there, this code is unsafe if something goes wrong in the destructor. Never code like that! –  Arnaud Bouchez Aug 29 '13 at 6:21
1  
@Arnaud The concern about exceptions in destructors is misplaced. In code that everyone write are destructors whose implementation is just a list of calls to Free. Nobody worries about the issue there. So why get up-tight here? –  David Heffernan Aug 29 '13 at 7:39
    
Same problem as @JRL's solution: The .Create calls should precede the try finally block as the destructor is automatically called upon constructor exception –  whosrdaddy Aug 29 '13 at 9:42
1  
@whosrdaddy There's no problem at all. When the scenario you describe occurs, the object reference, e.g. T1, is not assigned. And thus T1.Free is a no-op. –  David Heffernan Aug 29 '13 at 9:49
    
@DavidHeffernan Did you see such code in the VCL? nested try..finally blocks is the proper/classic/safe way. This code mimics the behavior emitted by the compiler for local interface variables (which will be initialized with nil at method entering, and create one try..finally block). But compiler generated code is safe, whereas you can easily forget to write something by hand, whereas try..finally are easy to insert from the IDE editor, and much easier to work with when your code grows and you want to refactor it in smaller methods. –  Arnaud Bouchez Aug 29 '13 at 12:41

Yes, this code works, although I would personally be inclined to add inherited to your constructor and destructor.

There are many libraries out there that have implementations that use this mechanism. The latest Delphi compilers for mobile platforms manage object lifetimes using ARC, automated reference counting, which is the same technique but baked into the compiler's treatment of object references.

share|improve this answer
    
Oops, you are correct - I've added inherited to the destructor. I don't know that it is required on the constructor is it? –  Alister Aug 28 '13 at 20:40
1  
You can omit it, but why would you do so? –  David Heffernan Aug 28 '13 at 20:41
    
I've been told we are not going to see ARC for the VCL, but I think we will be seeing it for FireMonkey on the desktop - which would be cool. –  Alister Aug 28 '13 at 20:50

I have a set of helper functions to make @JRL's approach more digestible.

procedure InitialiseNil(var Obj1); overload;
procedure InitialiseNil(var Obj1, Obj2); overload;
procedure InitialiseNil(var Obj1, Obj2, Obj3); overload;

procedure FreeAndNil(var Obj1); overload;
procedure FreeAndNil(var Obj1, Obj2); overload;
procedure FreeAndNil(var Obj1, Obj2, Obj3); overload;

In fact my code has versions with even more parameters. For ease of maintenance this code is all automatically generated from a short Python script.

These methods are implemented in the obvious way, e.g.

procedure FreeAndNil(var Obj1, Obj2);
var
  Temp1, Temp2: TObject;
begin
  Temp1 := TObject(Obj1);
  Temp2 := TObject(Obj2);
  Pointer(Obj1) := nil;
  Pointer(Obj2) := nil;
  Temp1.Free;
  Temp2.Free;
end;

This allows us to re-write the code in the question like this:

InitialiseNil(T1, T2, T3);
try
  T1 := TTestObject.Create('One');
  T2 := TTestObject.Create('Two');
  T3 := TTestObject.Create('Three');
finally
  FreeAndNil(T3, T2, T1);
end;

And the Python script:

count = 8

def VarList(count, prefix):
  s = ""
  for i in range(count):
    if i<>0:
      s = s + ", "
    s = s + prefix + str(i+1)
  return s

def InitialiseNilIntf(count):
  print "procedure InitialiseNil(var " + VarList(count, "Obj") + "); overload;"

def FreeAndNilIntf(count):
  print "procedure FreeAndNil(var " + VarList(count, "Obj") + "); overload;"

def InitialiseNilImpl(count):
  print "procedure InitialiseNil(var " + VarList(count, "Obj") + ");"
  print "begin"
  for i in range(count):
    print "  Pointer(Obj%s) := nil;" % str(i+1)
  print "end;"
  print

def FreeAndNilImpl(count):
  print "procedure FreeAndNil(var " + VarList(count, "Obj") + ");"
  print "var"
  print "  " + VarList(count, "Temp") + ": TObject;"
  print "begin"
  for i in range(count):
    print "  Temp%s := TObject(Obj%s);" % (str(i+1), str(i+1))
  for i in range(count):
    print "  Pointer(Obj%s) := nil;" % str(i+1)
  for i in range(count):
    print "  Temp%s.Free;" % str(i+1)
  print "end;"
  print

for i in range(count):
  InitialiseNilIntf(i+1)
print
for i in range(count):
  FreeAndNilIntf(i+1)
print
for i in range(count):
  InitialiseNilImpl(i+1)
print
for i in range(count):
  FreeAndNilImpl(i+1)
share|improve this answer
    
could you post the entire Python script output on pastebin or whatever? –  kobik Aug 29 '13 at 11:04
2  
@kobik ideone.com/59XwUl –  David Heffernan Aug 29 '13 at 11:07

Here's a slightly different implementation of the same idea:

unit ObjectGuard;

interface

type
  TObjectReference = ^TObject;

  { TObjectGuard }
  TObjectGuard = class(TInterfacedObject)
  private
    fUsed: integer;
    fObjectVariable: array [0..9] of TObjectReference;
  public
    constructor Create(var v0); overload;
    constructor Create(var v0, v1); overload;
// add overloaded constructors for 3,4,5... variables
    destructor Destroy; override;
  end;

implementation

constructor TObjectGuard.Create(var v0);
begin
  fObjectVariable[0] := @TObject(v0);
  Tobject(v0) := nil;
  fUsed := 1;
end;

constructor TObjectGuard.Create(var v0, v1);
begin
  fObjectVariable[0] := @TObject(v0);
  Tobject(v0) := nil;
  fObjectVariable[1] := @TObject(v1);
  Tobject(v1) := nil;
  fUsed := 2;
end;

destructor TObjectGuard.Destroy;
var
  i: integer;
begin
  for i := 0 to FUsed - 1 do
    if Assigned(fObjectVariable[i]^) then
    begin
      fObjectVariable[i]^.Free;
      fObjectVariable[i]^ := nil;
    end;
  inherited;
end;

end.

The advantage being the simple usage, such as:

procedure Test;
var
  Guard: IInterface
  vStringList: TStringList;
  vForm: TForm;
begin
  Guard := TObjectGuard.Create(vStringList, vForm);
  vStringList := TStringList.Create;
  vForm:= TForm.Create(nil);
  // code that does something
end;

It's convenient that you can create the Guard at the beginning of the method and pass any number of Variables in one call. So you don't have to first create object instances.

Also notice the variables will automatically be initialised to nil in the Constructor.

Edit: Also, due to the fact that interface lifetime is equal to the execution time of the method, we can use that for profiling, perhaps IFDEF-ed for easier control.

share|improve this answer
    
Could you have a constructor that takes an array of objects? This is an interesting solution that I will have to play with. –  Alister Aug 28 '13 at 22:19
    
I don't think you can use an array in the same way here. I just have 9 overloaded constructors, but I never really have more than 4-5 object variables in a method –  Daniel Maurić Aug 28 '13 at 23:02
1  
I've played around with this and changed it to use a FreeList : TList<TObjectReference>;. And added a Fluent Add method - function TObjectGuard.add(var v) : TObjectGuard;. So that you can do- Guard := TObjectGuard.Create.Add(T1).Add(T2).Add(T3); –  Alister Aug 28 '13 at 23:16

It's tricky to understand which method to use based on the end purpose, but in some cases, this is where I tend to implement subroutines, or in general separate my code into different functions. For example...

FOne: TSomeObject;
FTwo: TSomeObject;
FThree: TSomeObject;

....

procedure DoSomething;
begin
  FOne:= TSomeObject.Create;
  try
    //a bunch of code which only needs FOne
    DoSomethingElse;
  finally
    FOne.Free;
  end;
end;

procedure DoSomethingElse;
begin
  FTwo:= TSomeObject.Create;
  try
    ShowMessage(DoYetAnother);
    //A bunch of code that requires FTwo
  finally
    FTwo.Free;
  end;
end;

function DoYetAnother: String;
begin
  FThree:= TSomeObject.Create;
  try
    //Do something with FOne, FTwo, and FThree
    Result:= FOne.Something + FTwo.Something + FThree.Something;
  finally
    FThree.Free;
  end;
end;

Again, it's difficult for you to understand how this would work without a more real-life scenario. I'm still thinking for a good example and will gladly edit when I think of one. The general idea though is separating different segments of business rule into different re-usable blocks of code.

Alternatively, rather than declaring global variables, you could also pass parameters from one procedure to the next.

share|improve this answer
2  
I like this point of view (though I hesitate to use word "like" on StackOverflow anymore :-) Usually (not always, of course), if one is working with a certain object (create, do something, and free), it is due to a certain reason which can be named. And if can be named, it can be wrapped to a method (or procedure) in my opinion. –  TLama Aug 28 '13 at 21:39
    
I usually tend to work with no more than 2 (two!) interacting objects at the time. If I have to use third object, I'm usually isolating code to the subroutines (locals are good too). This rule effectively reduces ugliness of nested blocks to the acceptable minimum. –  OnTheFly Aug 28 '13 at 22:08

I don't see the need to wrap the destructor in an interface. By default, Delphi builds a behind-the-scene try/finally into each procedure/function that uses interfaces, in which the reference count of the interfaces are decreased, thus calling the destructor when it reaches zero.

I had a quick check, but (at least in Delphi 7) an exception in one destructor will stop the other destructors, sadly enough. One way to stop this is write try/except's in each destructor, but this is again more code somewhere else just to save on code in the first place...

type
  IMyIntf=interface(IInterface)
    function GetName:string;
    procedure SetName(const Name:string);
    property Name:string read GetName write SetName;
  end;

  TMyObj=class(TInterfacedObject, IMyIntf)
  private
    FName:string;
    function GetName:string;
    procedure SetName(const Name:string);
  public
    constructor Create(const Name:string);
    destructor Destroy; override;
  end;

procedure TForm1.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
var
  x,y:IMyIntf;
begin
  x:=TMyObj.Create('a');
  y:=TMyObj.Create('b');

  x.Name:='x';
  y.Name:='y';
end;

{ TMyObj }

constructor TMyObj.Create(const Name: string);
begin
  inherited Create;
  FName:=Name;
end;

destructor TMyObj.Destroy;
begin
  MessageBox(Application.Handle,PChar(FName),'test',MB_OK);
  //test: raise Exception.Create('Destructor '+FName);
  inherited;
end;

function TMyObj.GetName: string;
begin
  Result:=FName;
end;

procedure TMyObj.SetName(const Name: string);
begin
  FName:=Name;
end;
share|improve this answer
    
FWIW, desktop window should not be used as a dialog owner –  David Heffernan Aug 29 '13 at 16:54
    
oops, during the years of debugging, I've grown a custom of doing MessageBox(GetDesktopWindow,,,MB_OK or MB_SYSTEMMODAL) to be sure it would show in all cases. I forgot the systemmodal, but apparently still use GetDesktopWindow. If I remember correctly, one could pass 0 just as well. –  Stijn Sanders Aug 29 '13 at 20:06
    
It's a bad idea. Raymond Chen has covered this. –  David Heffernan Aug 29 '13 at 20:24

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.