Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Presently I have four classes for a basic MUD client: WeatherDriver for the main class, and LineReader to put handle an InputStream and LineParser to parse the Queue of String's, while Connection holds the Apache telnet connection. This is based off the Apache Weather Telnet example.

How does LineReader know when to stop reading the InputStream to send a message to WeatherDriver to start parsing?

LineReader:

package teln;

import static java.lang.System.out;
import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.InputStream;
import java.io.InputStreamReader;
import java.util.LinkedList;
import java.util.Queue;

public class LineReader {

    private String prompt = "/[#]/";

    public LineReader() {
    }

    public Queue<String> readInputStream(InputStream inputStream) throws IOException {
        InputStreamReader inputStreamReader = new InputStreamReader(inputStream);
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(inputStreamReader);
        String line = br.readLine();

        Queue<String> lines = new LinkedList<>();
        while (line != null) { //never terminates...
            sb.append(line);
            line = br.readLine();
            lines.add(line);
        }
        out.println(lines);
        return lines;
    }

    public void setPrompt(String prompt) {
        this.prompt = prompt;  //need to determine EOL somehow...
    }
}

Connection:

package teln;

import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.InputStream;
import java.net.InetAddress;
import java.net.SocketException;
import org.apache.commons.net.telnet.TelnetClient;

public class Connection {

    private TelnetClient tc = new TelnetClient();

    public Connection() {
    }

    public Connection(InetAddress h, int p, String prompt) throws SocketException, IOException {
        tc.connect(h, p);
    }

    public InputStream getInputStream() {
        return tc.getInputStream();
    }
}

WeatherDriver:

package teln;

import static java.lang.System.out;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.InputStream;
import java.net.InetAddress;
import java.net.SocketException;
import java.net.UnknownHostException;
import java.util.Properties;
import java.util.Queue;

public final class WeatherDriver {

    private static Connection c;
    private static LineReader lineReader = new LineReader();
    private static LineParser lineParser = new LineParser();

    public static void main(String[] args) throws UnknownHostException, SocketException, IOException {
        Properties props = PropertiesReader.getProps();
        InetAddress host = InetAddress.getByName(props.getProperty("host"));
        int port = Integer.parseInt(props.getProperty("port"));
        String prompt = props.getProperty("prompt");
          out.println("connecting...");
        c = new Connection(host, port, prompt);
        InputStream inputStream = c.getInputStream();
        out.println("got stream");
        Queue<String> lines = lineReader.readInputStream(inputStream);
        out.println("got lines");
        lineParser.parseLines(lines);
        out.println("parsed lines");
    }
}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

Your line reader has to understand enough of the "protocol" to detect when the program controlling the terminal wants input. I.e. there must be a prompt of some kind indicating a "line turnaround". When it detects this it stops reading and lets your front-end perform the next action.

This gets complex if the remote system has different ways of indicating it's waiting for input (different kinds of prompts) and if you need to detect timeout conditions and take some special action.

You may benefit from drawing a state diagram showing the various states the remote program can be in and how transitions from state to state are communicated by the program's output to the telnet session.

share|improve this answer
    
please do take a look at my work-around answer. –  Thufir Aug 29 '13 at 6:52

Took a page from Pearson, and the following writes each character (I think). It's the printToConsole method.

package teln;

import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.InputStream;
import java.io.PrintStream;
import java.net.InetAddress;
import java.net.SocketException;
import org.apache.commons.net.telnet.TelnetClient;

public class Connection {

    private TelnetClient tc = new TelnetClient();
    private boolean isl = false;
    private String u;
    private String pw;
    //private StreamReader sr;
    private InputStream in;
    private PrintStream out;

    private Connection() {
    }

    public Connection(InetAddress h, int p, String prompt, String u, String pw) throws SocketException, IOException, InterruptedException {
        tc.connect(h, p);
        this.u = u;
        this.pw = pw;
        in = tc.getInputStream();
        out = new PrintStream(tc.getOutputStream());
        printToConsole();
    }

    public void printToConsole() throws IOException  {
        char ch = (char) in.read();
        while (true) {
            System.out.print(ch);
            ch = (char) in.read();
        }
    }

    public InputStream getInputStream() {
        return tc.getInputStream();
    }

    void cmd(String s) throws IllegalArgumentException, IOException {
        byte[] by = s.getBytes();
        for (Byte b : by) {
            tc.sendCommand(b);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is not a line based solution. –  Barışcan Kayaoğlu Feb 25 '14 at 15:41

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.