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I have a CSV file that looks as such:

header1, header2, header3, header4
1, 2, 3, abc
4, 5, 6, abc
7, 8, 9, abc

My goal is to only change the values marked as "abc". I want the file to look like this when I'm done:

header1, header2, header3, header4
1, 2, 3, test
4, 5, 6, test
7, 8, 9, test

The code I have come up with so far is as follows:

import csv

with open('test2-2.csv', 'w') as csvout:
    write=csv.writer(csvout, delimiter=',', lineterminator='\r')
    with open('test2.csv', 'rb') as csvfile:
        read=csv.reader(csvfile, delimiter=',')
        for row in read:    
            row[3]="test"
            write.writenow(row)

The problem with this code is that it overwrites the "header4" location as well, so it comes out looking like this:

header1, header2, header3, test
1, 2, 3, test
4, 5, 6, test
7, 8, 9, test

Is there any way to specify the index locations I want to change?

Thanks for any help!

Here is the new code that works with this example:

import csv

with open('test2-2.csv', 'w') as csvout:
    write=csv.writer(csvout, delimiter=',', lineterminator='\r')
    with open('test.csv', 'rb') as csvfile:
        read=csv.reader(csvfile, delimiter=',')
        header=next(read)
        write.writerow(header)
        for row in read:    
            row[3]="test"
            write.writerow(row)
share|improve this question
    
The code you've given us will raise an AttributeError because of a typo. Also, either your CSV files don't actually have those spaces, or your code actually has another parameter in the reader/writer constructors, or it doesn't actually work. Please give us actual runnable code, input, and output, not just vague approximations of it, if you want us to debug your code. –  abarnert Aug 28 '13 at 21:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you're just looking for a way to treat the header row separately, that's pretty easy: Just process the first row separately.

with open('test2-2.csv', 'w') as csvout:
    write=csv.writer(csvout, delimiter=',', lineterminator='\r')
    with open('test2.csv', 'rb') as csvfile:
        read=csv.reader(csvfile, delimiter=',')
        header = next(read)
        write.writerow(header)
        for row in read:
            row[3]="test"
            write.writenow(row)

(Note that this still has the same bugs are your original code—at least one typo, writenow, a missing skipinitialspace=True, etc.)


If you want to change things by some different rule, just write a different transformation. As long as you can describe it in English, you should be able to convert it to Python pretty easily.

For example, if you wanted to change any 6 in any column into test:

for row in read:
    row = ('test' if col == '6' else col for col in row)
    write.writenow(row)

Or, if you wanted to change column 2 of row 3 into test:

for i, row in enumerate(read):
    if i == 3:
        row[2] = 'test'
    write.writenow(row)

Or, if you wanted to change any 6 in column 2 of any row:

for i, row in enumerate(read):
    if row[2] == '6':
        row[2] = 'test'
    write.writenow(row)

… and so on.

share|improve this answer
    
This worked great for skipping over the first line. However, if I wanted to change "6" to "test" as well. Could I specify that location? –  Josh Aug 28 '13 at 21:26
    
What do you mean 'if I wanted to change "6" to "test"'? Are you looking to change all instances of the value 6 in any column? Or column 2 of row 3? Or…? –  abarnert Aug 28 '13 at 21:37

Just wrap your replacing code with an if block, and use enumerate() (see #added comments):

import csv

with open('test2-2.csv', 'w') as csvout:
    write=csv.writer(csvout, delimiter=',', lineterminator='\r')
    with open('test2.csv', 'rb') as csvfile:
        read=csv.reader(csvfile, delimiter=',')
        for row in enumerate(read): #modified
            if row[0] >= 1: #added
                row[1][3]="test"
                write.writenow(row)
share|improve this answer
    
Why would you go to all this length? If you really want the row number, just wrap enumerate around the read instead of trying to keep track of it manually like this. But you don't even need it here. –  abarnert Aug 28 '13 at 21:15
    
well, I didn't remember that function, see modified answer. –  Kroltan Aug 28 '13 at 21:41

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