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I'm using pygame to build a simple game and have the following main loop, where mouse() is a function to capture and process mouse events and keyboard() for keyboard events:

def mainLoop():
    pygame.event.pump()
    keyboard(pygame.key.get_pressed())
    events = pygame.event.get()
    mouse(events)
    for event in events:
        if event.type == pygame.QUIT:
            pygame.quit()
            return False
    return True

When a player clicks on a tile I have the following function called by mouse():

def objReach(obj, pos):     
    try:
        path = obj.reach(pos, move=False)       # A* (path-finding algorithm)
        for step in path:
            sleep(1.0/obj.speed)
            objMove(obj, step)
    except Exception as e:
        sendMsg(str(e))

The problem is, while the object is walking the path (while the for loop is running) mouse events don't get captured, so if the player clicks on another tile in the middle of the way, nothing happens. I want the player to be able to change paths.

I tried using mainLoop inside the for loop, but it was only partially effective - it only captures the MOUSEBUTTONUP event, not both UP and DOWN events, which are necessary to determine if the player is merely clicking or dragging and dropping. Here's the mouse() function to clarify:

def mouse(events):
    global clickPos
    global releasePos

    for event in events:
        if event.type == MOUSEBUTTONDOWN:
            clickPos = getPos(pygame.mouse.get_pos())
            # getPos() transforms screen coordinates in game coordinates
        elif event.type == MOUSEBUTTONUP:
            releasePos = getPos(pygame.mouse.get_pos())
            if event.button == MAIN_BUTTON:
                # Simple click
                if clickPos == releasePos:
                    if player.privilege > 1:
                        objMove(player, getPos(pygame.mouse.get_pos()))
                    else:
                        objReach(player, getPos(pygame.mouse.get_pos()))
                # Drag and drop
                else:
                    obj = player.place.matrix[clickPos[0]][clickPos[1]][-1]
                    objThrow(obj, clickPos, releasePos)
            elif event.button == SECONDARY_BUTTON:
                pass        # TODO: ...

I'm not familiar with multithreading and I don't think it's supposed to be used with pygame, but it was the only thing I could think of. Any ideas?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Instead of mucking around with multithreading and directly causing the object to move within the objReach function and blocking the mainloop, you could try modifying your object so that it has something like a obj list. It would basically act as a queue which contains the coordinates of each position to move to.

Then, what you would do is when the mouse is clicked, use your pathfinding algorithm to find the path the object should travel along and replace the queue with it:

import time

def objReach(obj, pos):     
    try:
        obj.path = obj.reach(pos, move=False)       # A* (path-finding algorithm)
        obj.last_move = time.time()
        obj.move_after = 1   # move every 1 second.
    except Exception as e:
        sendMsg(str(e))

Then, within your mainloop, once every second (using a timer of some sort to keep track of when 1 second has passed), make your object pop the next coordinate in the list and move to it.

It would look something like this:

def mainLoop():
    pygame.event.pump()
    keyboard(pygame.key.get_pressed())
    events = pygame.event.get()
    mouse(events)
    for event in events:
        if event.type == pygame.QUIT:
            pygame.quit()
            return False

    if time.time() - obj.last_move > obj.move_after:
        obj.last_move = time.time()
        objMove(obj, obj.path.pop())

    return True

This way, the code that makes the object move is relocated to be within the mainloop so that you can still respond to all events.

If the user clicks a new tile, then the path is automatically overridden, and the mainloop will do the right thing correctly.

If you structured your code correctly, you could even extend the game so that it can handle multiple objects moving around on the tiles simultaneously, moving at different speeds.

share|improve this answer
    
Very clever, I'll give it a try. Thank you. –  Alex Aug 28 '13 at 23:34

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