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Why do C enumeration constants need a name? Because this:

#include <stdio.h>

enum {NO, YES};

int main(void)
{
    printf("%d\n", YES);
}

works just the same as this:

#include <stdio.h>

enum boolean {NO, YES};

int main(void)
{
    printf("%d\n", YES);
}
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Please stop changing the name of your enumeration type - it means that our answers don't make sense! –  anon Dec 4 '09 at 22:04
    
heh e, you're too fast with the answers! ;p –  Gary Willoughby Dec 4 '09 at 22:09
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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If you want to create a type that is 'of the enum', such as:

enum boolean x;
x = NO;

The easier way to do this is with a typedef:

typedef enum {NO, YES} boolean;

And then all you have to do is use boolean as the type:

boolean x;
x = NO;
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So that you can create variables of the enumeration type:

enum boolean read_file = NO;
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If I'm understanding you right you're simply using an example that is too basic.

Days of the week is a good example of enums.

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Well, you might want to define a function like this:

void here_is_my_answer(boolean v)
{
   if (v == YES) { 
   } else {
   {
}
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