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I'm implementing Boruvka's algorithm in C++ to find minimum spanning tree for a graph. This algorithm finds a minimum-weight edge for each supervertex (a supervertex is a connected component, it is simply a vertex in the first iteration) and adds them into the MST. Once an edge is added, we update the connected components and repeat the find-min-edge, and merge-supervertices process, until all the vertices in the graph are in one connected component.

Since find-min-edge for each supervertex can be done in parallel, I want to use OpenMP to do this. Here is the omp for loop I would like to use for parallel find-min.

int index[NUM_VERTICES];
#pragma omp parallel private(nthreads, tid, index, min) shared(minedgeindex, setcount, forest, EV, umark)
{
#pragma omp for
  for(int k = 0; k < setcount; k++){  //iterate over supervertices, omp for here

        min = 9999;
        std::fill_n(index, NUM_VERTICES, -1);

    /* Gets minimum edge for each supervertex */
    for(int i = 0; i < NUM_VERTICES; i++) {
         if(forest[i]->mark == umark[k]){    //find vertices with mark k
            for(int j = 0; j < NUM_EDGES; j++) {    
//check min edge for each vertex in the supervertex k
                if(EV[j].v1==i){
                    if(Find(forest[EV[j].v1])!= Find(forest[EV[j].v2])){
                            if(EV[j].w <= min ){
                                    min = EV[j].w;
                                    index[k] = j;
                                    break;  //break looping over edges for current vertex i, go to next vertex i+1
                            }
                    }
                }
            }
         }

    }   //end finding min disjoint-connecting edge for the supervertex with mark k

        if(index[k] != -1){
            minedgeindex.insert(minedgeindex.begin(), index[k]);
        }

    }       //omp for end
}

Since I'm new to OpenMP, I currently cannot make it work as I expected.

Let me briefly explain what I'm doing in this block of code: setcount is the number of supervertices. EV is a vector containing all edges (Edge is a struct I defined previously, has attributes v1, v2, w which correspond to the two nodes it connects and its weight). minedgeindex is a vector, I want each thread to find min edge for each connected component, and add the index (index j in EV) of the min edge to vector minedgeindex at the same time. So I think minedgeindex should be shared. forest is a struct for each vertex, it has a set mark umark indicating which supervertex it's in. I use Union-Find to mark all supervertices, but it is not relevant in this block of omp code.

The ultimate goal I need for this block of code is to give me the correct vector minedgeindex containing all min edges for each supervertex.

To be more clear and ignore the graph background, I just have a large vector of numbers, I separate them into a bunch of sets, then I need some parallel threads to find the min for each set of numbers and give me back the indices for those mins, store them in a vector minedgeindex.

If you need more clarification just ask me. Please help me make this work, I think the main issue is the declaration of private and shared variables which I don't know if I'm doing right.

Thank you in advance!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Allocating an array outside of a parallel block and then declaring it private is not going to work.

Edit: After reading through your code again it does not appear that index should even be private. In that case you should just declare it outside the parallel block (as you did) but not declare it private. But I am not sure you even need index to be an array. I think you can just declare it as an private int.

Additionally, you can't fill minedgeindex like you did. That causes a race condition. You need to put it in a critical section. Personally I would try and use push_back and not insert from the beginning of the array since that's inefficient.

Some people prefer to explicitly declare everything shared and private. In standard C you sorta have to do this, at least for private. But for C99/C++ this is not necessary. I prefer to only declare shared/private if it's necessary. Everything outside of the parallel region is shared (unless it's an index used in a parallel loop) and everything inside is private. If you keep that in mind you rarely have to explicitly declare data shared or private.

    //int index[NUM_VERTICES]; //index is shared
    //std::fill_n(index, NUM_VERTICES, -1);
    #pragma omp parallel
    {   
        #pragma omp for
        for(int k = 0; k < setcount; k++){  //iterate over supervertices, omp for here
            int min = 9999; // min is private
            int index = -1;

            //iterate over supervertices

            if(index != -1){
                #pragma omp critical
                minedgeindex.insert(minedgeindex.begin(), index);
                //minedgeindex.insert(minedgeindex.begin(), index[k]);
            }
        }
    }

Now that the code is working here are some suggestions to perhaps speed it up.

Using the critical declaration inside the loop could be very inefficient. I suggest filling a private array (std::vector) and then merging them after the parallel loop (but still in the parallel block). The loop has an implicit barrier which is not necessary. This can be removed with nowait.

Independent of the critical section the time to find each minimum can vary per iteration so you may want to consider schedule(dynamic). The following code does all this. Some variation of these suggestions, if not all, may improve your performance.

#pragma omp parallel
{
    vector<int> minedgeindex_private;
    #pragma omp for schedule(dynamic) nowait
    for(int k = 0; k < setcount; k++){  //iterate over supervertices, omp for here
        int min = 9999;
        int index = -1;

        //iterate over supervertices

        if(index != -1){
            minedgeindex_private.push_back(index);
        }
    }
    #pragma omp critical
    minedgeindex.insert(
        minedgeindex.end(),
        minedgeindex_private.begin(), minedgeindex_private.end());
}
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Thank you so much! It works perfectly now. Your answer is crystal clear and very helpful. I also prefer doing it your way without declaring private and shared, that makes more intuitive sense. And yes I should use push_back instead of insert! –  Logan Yang Aug 29 '13 at 20:33
    
@LoganYang, I'm glad I could help :-) How is the performance? I added some code that may improvement the performance. –  Z boson Aug 30 '13 at 7:10
    
The serial version runs 30000 vertices and took 1524s. The omp version with your first advice runs in 912s, which is fairly good I think. I have a question about your second suggestion: each thread have its own copy of the vector 'minedgeindex_private', right? And if you look at the middle block of my code, there is a loop over j which finds the min for the supervertex k (let me use k here as a specific number in the loop of k = 1 to setcount). Originally, index[k] stores the min for the whole supervertex k. –  Logan Yang Aug 30 '13 at 23:55
    
As for 'minedgeindex_private', it contains all min-edges for each vertex in that supervertex (since for index[k] there are over-written values, and for the vector we kept all values by "push_back") Assume we have k threads each for one supervertex, we now have k 'minedgeindex_private's to merge. Each of them has a list of edges instead of one min for the supervertex. Basically if we use 'minedgeindex_private', let me label these private copies with its thread k, we have minedgeindex_private[k]={...} instead of a single index[k]=j. So is it wrong or I misunderstood it? Thanks for your patience! –  Logan Yang Aug 31 '13 at 0:28
    
@LoganYang, you're correct that each thread get's it's own private copy of the variable minedgeindex_private. However, you parallelize the loop over k so each minedgeindex_private will be acted on by independent regions of k. When you merge them there should be no overlap. Be careful not to confuse the number of threads with the values you are looping over. I don't see a problem yet but I don't have you're full code. Did you test the changes I suggested? –  Z boson Sep 1 '13 at 19:41

This is not going to work efficiently with openMP, because omp for simply splits the work statically between all threads, i.e. each threads gets a fair share of the supervertices. However, the work per supervertex may be uneven, when the work-sharing between treads not be even.

You can try to use dynamic or guided schedule with openMP, but better is to avoid openMP altogether and use TBB, when tbb::parallel_for() avoids this issue.


OpenMP has several disadvantages: 1) it is pre-processor based 2) it has rather limited functionality (this is what I highlighted above) 3) it isn't standardised for C++ (in particular C++11)

TBB is a pure C++ library (no preprocessor hack) with full C++11 support. For more details, see my answer to this question

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1  
Could you also explain how tbb::parallel_for() works and how it is better than openMP? –  Logan Yang Sep 2 '13 at 22:19
    
@Walter, yes, I would like to know why tbb:parallel_for() is going to be better than #pragma omp for schedule(dynamic) –  Z boson Sep 3 '13 at 11:24
    
@redrum It's presumably not faster in most situations, but avoids all the openMP pain in the backside. TBB uses recursive task-based parallelism, so a loop is divided recursively into chunks. The size of a final chunk (one that is not further split) is automatically adapted such as to avoid starvation even if the work per iterations is highly variable. –  Walter Sep 3 '13 at 15:29
    
@Walter, that's interesting to know. I don't consider OpenMP to be a pain though. It's quite easy to use and I don't need all the C++ niceties. In almost every case I have found a way to get good efficiency with OpenMP. It's also available by default with MSVC, GCC, and ICC which I find very convenient. I don't use clang. But if TBB handles load balancing better then it's worth considering. –  Z boson Sep 3 '13 at 16:29

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