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We have these four tables:

Store (
    row bigint,
    id uniqueidentifier,
    name varchar
)

Products (
    row bigint,
    id uniqueidentifier,
    storeID uniqueidentifier,
    productname varchar
)

Customer (
    row bigint,
    id uniqueidentifier,
    storeID uniqueidentifier,
    fName,
    lName,
    email
)

orders (
    row bigint,
    id uniqueidentifier,
    store_ID uniqueidentifier,
    cust_id uniqueidentifier,
    prod_id uniqueidentifier,
    date datetime
)

We need to find 30 random rows in the orders table for a particular store.

Here is my first try at it:

  select TOP 30 * from orders o inner join store s on o.Retailer_ID=s.ID
    where s.Name='XXXX' and  o.Row in (select  ABS(CAST(CAST(NEWID() AS      
               VARBINARY) AS int)) %100000  from orders) and o.Retailer_ID =(select ID 
                  from store s where s.Name= 'XXXX')

But I'm not real happy with the results because I feel that the range of rows will never be single digits and the random calculation that I do just doesn't seem that great at creating a real random number from row 1 to row-max-number. I'm not exactly sure how many rows are in the orders table in the first place which could be another issue.

Is there a better method to finding random rows in a table?

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Why not simple do SELECT TOP ... ORDER BY NEWID() ? –  Yuriy Galanter Aug 29 '13 at 0:52
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can also do it this way:

select TOP 30 *
from orders o inner join
     store s
     on o.Retailer_ID = s.ID
where s.Name='XXXX'
order by newid();

This is returning random rows by randomly sorting the data and then choosing the top 30 rows. In SQL Server, ordering by newid() is a way to randomly sort the data.

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Thank you very much, looks like a nice query. So every time I run this query, I will get different orders for a given store? I tried to run this on my server, and I didn't get any rows? –  Jerome Landis Aug 29 '13 at 1:02
1  
@JeromeLandis . . . I just noticed that the in clause is redundant, but that shouldn't cause any filtering of the rows. Does the query return anything without the order by? –  Gordon Linoff Aug 29 '13 at 1:04
    
Thank you for the quick response. It does return rows now. The issue might be that I do not have many rows in my test system, so I will try to add another 50 rows or so and see if I can generate random rows with the query every time. One thing that I really don't understand is how it is generating random rows. If you comment about that, that would be excellent. I think the order by newid() has something to do with it, but I don't understand why it is there... thank you sir! –  Jerome Landis Aug 29 '13 at 1:10
    
Now it makes sense. Order by a random number, great idea. Thank you again! –  Jerome Landis Aug 29 '13 at 1:23
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Things are much simpler.

   select TOP 30 *
    from orders o 
         join store s on o.Retailer_ID=s.ID
    where s.Name='XXXX'
    order by newid()
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much, looks like a nice query. So every time I run this query, I will get different orders for a given store? I tried to run this on my server, and I didn't get any rows? –  Jerome Landis Aug 29 '13 at 1:02
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