Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Consider the following c++ code

class A
{
public:
  void doStuff() {};
  void callStuff()
  {
    doStuff(true);
    doStuff();
  };
private:
  void doStuff(bool doIt = false) {};
};

int main()
{
  A a;
  a.doStuff();
  a.callStuff();

  return 0;
}

Not surprisingly, GCC gives several errors when compiling this:

overload.cpp: In member function ‘void A::callStuff()’:                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
overload.cpp:8:10: error: call of overloaded ‘doStuff()’ is ambiguous                                                                                                                                                                                                          
  doStuff();                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
          ^                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
overload.cpp:8:10: note: candidates are:                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
overload.cpp:4:12: note: void A::doStuff()                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     
       void doStuff() {};                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      
            ^                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
overload.cpp:11:12: note: void A::doStuff(bool)                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
       void doStuff(bool doIt = false) {};
            ^
overload.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
overload.cpp:17:17: error: call of overloaded ‘doStuff()’ is ambiguous
       a.doStuff();
                 ^
overload.cpp:17:17: note: candidates are:
overload.cpp:4:12: note: void A::doStuff()
       void doStuff() {};
            ^
overload.cpp:11:12: note: void A::doStuff(bool)
       void doStuff(bool doIt = false) {};
            ^

I have several questions:

  • How can I tell the compiler which overload I want to use? Will I be forced to remove one of them?
  • If I have to remove one of them, how can I find this problem at compile time without trying to call the overload? As long as I am not calling them everything should compile fine so I might only find out later that I am unable to call an overload that I have added once I am trying to call it.
  • Why does the second error occur? The main function should not be able to access the private overload so it should know which one to use.
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

How can I tell the compiler which overload I want to use? Will I be forced to remove one of them?

You can't, just remove or rename one of them.

If I have to remove one of them, how can I find this problem at compile time without trying to call the overload? As long as I am not calling them everything should compile fine so I might only find out later that I am unable to call an overload that I have added once I am trying to call it.

You can't either. The ambiguity is only detected when you try to call the member function using no arguments. Even if you could perform some compile time checks, there would have to be very specific, and it would be easier to just remove or rename one of the overloads.

Why does the second error occur? The main function should not be able to access the private overload so it should know which one to use.

Unfortunately, overload resolution occurs before access specifiers are taken into account. Therefore, the compiler doesn't even take into account the fact that one of the overloads is private: the ambiguous call is found before that even happens. I don't really know why this happens this way, but that's what the standard says.

share|improve this answer

The cause of all your woes are related to your function definitions and their corresponding calls.

So, firstly, the compiler is correct in that your function calls are ambiguous, hence your errors - as it can't distinguish which version is required based on your usage. While member functions can be overloaded, with same name on the same scope, they must have different signatures (a member function's signature is comprised of the member function's name and the type and order of the member function's parameters).

Hence:

void doStuff() {};
void doStuff(bool doIt = false) {};

when called like this:

doStuff();

are equivalent, leading to an ambiguous function call as the compiler can't determine if you want to call:

void doStuff();

or

void doStuff(boo doIt = false);

with a unsupplied parameter value. Function visibility doesn't get to be checked because of the same problem.

The only around this is to change the name of one of the functions or the signature of the functions (while keeping the same name).

Hence, something like this is perfectly legal:

class A
{
public:
  void doStuff() {};
  void callStuff()
  {
    doStuff(1, true);
    doStuff();
  };
private:
  void doStuff(int i, bool doIt = false) {};
};

int main()
{
  A a;
  a.doStuff();
  a.callStuff();

  return 0;
}

Thus:

  1. Change the name of one of the functions or its signature as well as its corresponding function call.
  2. You can't because it's an ambiguous call. The only solution is to make the suggested changes described above.
  3. What mfontanini said:

Unfortunately, overload resolution occurs before access specifiers are taken into account. Therefore, the compiler doesn't even take into account the fact that one of the overloads is private: the ambiguity is found before that even happens.

See this link for additional reference:

http://www.learncpp.com/cpp-tutorial/77-default-parameters/

share|improve this answer

You need to remove the default parameters “bool doIt = false”.

class A
{
public:
  void doStuff() {};
  void callStuff()
  {
    doStuff(true);
    doStuff();
  };
private:
  //void doStuff(bool doIt = false) {};
  void doStuff(bool doIt) {};
};

int main()
{
  A a;
  a.doStuff();
  a.callStuff();

  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.